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Author Topic: State Hunting & Gun laws compared.  (Read 11775 times)

Solitar

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State Hunting & Gun laws compared.
« on: December 20, 2002, 04:56:32 pm »

As here in Colorado, many of the candidate states have no lower age limit for hunting, especially for small game (thus unless specified below, there is no lower age limit). Again, "no lower age limit" is predicated on the youngster passing the hunter safety course. As our State Wildlife Officer stated to me, if they can pass it, regardless of age, then they can get a license. We even give the test verbally to those who may not have sufficient reading and writing skills yet.

All the states do require a hunting safety class and certification and, as in Colorado, regardless of age, if a very young person can pass it, they qualify to get a license. There are exceptions among the candidate states. And there are some noteworthy other regs. Many of these regs may not make sense to those not familiar with hunting or have not read them in detail. Delaware warrants seeing its site for the rest of the story since it potentially limits the Right to Keep and Bear Arms.  For more info see this link.
http://www.huntfish.net/sportlaws.asp
Vermont: Apparently no lower limit.
Alaska: 15 or younger - no permit required. Under 10 must be accompanied by adult only if for big game.
Maine: Under 10 no hunting. 10+  for small game. 16+ for big game (may change to 14+)
Idaho: 10 & 11 okay for small game. 12+ for big game. Semi-auto rifles are okay.
Montana: Apparently no lower limit. At least 12 for big game.
Wyoming: Apparently no lower limit.
North Dakota: No lower limit. Under 15 must be accompanied. 14+ for big game.
South Dakota: At least 12 to hunt.
New Hampshire: No lower limit if accompanied. 16+ for license.
and...
Delaware: Under 12 must be accompanied by an adult. For deer licenses they must be at least 12. rifles not permitted!  Small game is limited to bow, shotgun, and .22 pistol only in final kill in traps. Deer is limited to bow, shotgun, crossbow, and muzzle loaders. Note that Delaware recognizes no legal hunting use for any rifle (other than muzzle loaders). This could be a "no pass" for rifle owners.
Here is the Delaware hunting and fishing regs page.
http://www.dnrec.state.de.us/fw/wildregs612.pdf


Some of us gun owners consider freedom to carry a litmus test. A state that makes it a hassle and prohibits carry in many places will be on our avoidance list. If owning a gun is a hassle of paperwork, we and our collection won't move there.

Concealed carry permits or, better yet, no required permits is a very important issue as an indicator of trust of the people.In the figures and other considerations below please consider the entire picture facing a potential applicant for a concealed carry permit. Note that, though Delaware has no restrictions on where you can carry, it apparently may be like our past sheriffs - “may issue but not issuing”. Also consider that, even though Wyoming and North Dakota are “shall issue”, the training requirement and list of prohibited places are effective disincentives to apply for permits -- as can be seen by the low proportion of people who actually end up getting permits. For many of us, if we can't carry while doing our banking, then that eliminates one of the biggest reasons to get a permit. Thus a greater proportion of Maine residents get permits than do Alaskans -- even though both “shall issue” states require training. South Dakotans have voted with their CCP applications -- they’ve the greatest proportion of residents with permits because of “shall issue” , no required training and few restrictions on where they can carry. New Hampshire likely has a similar proportion of permits for the same two reasons. Vermont and Alaska residents have it the best -- no permit or training required.
For FSP purposes of potential allies in a state, consider the absolute number of permit holders. South Dakota, Idaho, Maine and likely New Hampshire have more permit holders than the FSP’s goal of 20,000 activists. Vermont may have more allies too, but they don’t need permits and Alaskans no longer do -- for carry inside the state.

THE FINAL WORD:
How successful are people at getting permits?
Is it worth the hassle? This is measured by...
Concealed Carry Permits, per thousand residents

ratio  state                 # of permits and notes)
*****  Vermont (Not Applicable; no permit required)
-------  New Hampshire (# Not Available; shall issue; training NOT required)
63.39  South Dakota (47,853; shall issue; training NOT required)
27.45  Idaho (35,505; shall issue; familiarity may be required)
18.82  Maine (24,000; shall issue; training required)
11.62  Alaska (7,288; permits no longer required)
  9.32  Wyoming (4,601; shall issue; training required)
  7.59  North Dakota (4,872; shall issue; training required)
  5.65  Montana (5,100; shall issue; training required)
  1.40  Delaware (1,100; may issue; training NOT required)

Some of the following is in the State Data Page on the FSP website.
http://www.freestateproject.org/state.htm
Important considerations: Prohibited Places to Carry.
Delaware: none (but people apparently can’t get permits anyway)
Vermont & Alaska: no permit required
New Hampshire: courtrooms
Maine: bars
South Dakota: bars, state capital, courthouses
Montana: state, federal or local government buildings, banks, bars
Idaho: courthouses, juvenile facilities or jails, schools and school buses
Alaska: law-enforcement and correctional facilities, schools, courthouses, state and federal offices, secure area of airports, posted residences and meetings, financial institutions
Wyoming: law-enforcement facilities, prisons, courtrooms, meetings of government, schools, athletic events, churches, federal government property
North Dakota: bars, gaming sites, sporting events, schools, churches, political rallies and events, concerts, public parks and buildings, public gatherings
above extracted from
http://www.ccrkba.org/ccwstudy.html

The FSP site got its similar information from
http://www.distinctiveweb.com/gunlaws.htm
« Last Edit: August 12, 2003, 09:47:47 pm by Joe, aka, Solitar »
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Zxcv

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Re:State Hunting & Gun laws compared: Vermont best, Delaware worst.
« Reply #1 on: December 20, 2002, 08:25:05 pm »

Quote
All the states do require a hunting safety class and certification
I looked here:
http://www.ihea.com/infodb/go/mt
and here, the Montana Fish and Wildlife site:
http://www.fwp.state.mt.us/education/default.asp
and while Montana does have classes, it does not seem that they require classes.

Looks like if we get into some of these states, removing restrictions will be something on our table. I don't think that is actually hard to do with a little organization. Restrictions are silly if you think for 5 seconds about it.

I believe a lot of restrictions happen when the initial concealed carry law goes into place; they need to add this crap to get enough votes for passage. Once people are used to the idea of citizens carrying guns, it ought to be possible to simplify the law later.

Oregon looks pretty good after looking at some of these! BTW, we did get our law simplified and got the cost down.

Actually, I would be very disappointed if we couldn't get Vermont carry in any state we go into.
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Zxcv

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Re:State Hunting & Gun laws compared: Vermont best, Delaware worst.
« Reply #2 on: January 15, 2003, 03:33:46 pm »

Quote
Actually, I would be very disappointed if we couldn't get Vermont carry in any state we go into.

I have to revise that statement, to say it does not apply to Delaware. See the following, that I posted on the Delaware Report thread:
---------------------------------

Bad news for Delaware fans.

Just got my American Rifleman in the news today. It has two articles:

"Judge Dismisses Wilmington, Delaware, Suit Against Firearms Makers"

"Wilmington Mayor Vetoes City's Gun Registration Law"

Here is a link that describes both:
http://www.saf.org/pub/rkba/press-releases/DEdismissal.htm

The city council voted 6-3 for registration, and will attempt to override the veto. Apparently gun owners will look to Delaware's pre-emption law to knock it down if that happens. It's not clear this would be sufficient.

The point here is that these are two indicators of very strong statist tendencies in the city. Even here in what we call the People's Republic of Portland (Oregon), the city stayed off the gun-maker lawsuit wagon, and wouldn't dream of a registration law. The fact these things fly in Wilmington is proof of a very statist core in Wilmington; they obviously are not intended to accomplish anything beneficial. Politicians do these sorts of things because they play well with constituents.

If Portland has been instrumental in stopping pro-freedom ballot initiatives, think how much more the case this would be in Wilmington (assuming they have initiative - I don't know that). Gun issues are the "canary in the coal mine" indicator showing how statist a place is.

I've maintained on other threads that if FSP couldn't cause Vermont carry to pass in our chosen state, then we'd be a pretty worthless bunch. Looks like we'd have our hands full in Delaware fighting off city registration and just getting ordinary "government permitted" concealed carry laws passed.

The only good news in this sorry picture is that this is almost certainly in Wilmington proper (population about 70,000), not the metropolitan area. But still, when Delaware proponents complain about Vermont's core of socialists, it now looks like they are not admitting their own similar problem...
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Solitar

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Re:State Hunting & Gun laws compared: Vermont best, Delaware worst.
« Reply #3 on: February 08, 2003, 12:42:01 pm »

There is no direct measure of gun ownership because these United States do not have gun registration -- yet. The following is at least one attempt to estimate by proxy samplings.

State and Local Prevalence of Firearms Ownership
Quote
“two national surveys conducted on behalf of the Harvard Injury Control Research Center (HICRC) provide the basis for state-level estimates. These surveys were conducted by using the random-digit-dial technique in 1996 and 1999, with sample sizes of 1,900 and 2,500 respectively. States were sampled in proportion to their population relative to that of the United States, producing valid estimates of state-level household gun ownership, albeit with small sample sizes.”

Estimated Prevalence HICRC
Alaska not rated.
88% Wyoming
76% Idaho
76% Montana
71% Vermont
67% South Dakota
50% North Dakota
48% Maine
36% New Hampshire
29% Delaware

From FS/S (Firearm suicides/Suicides)
The difference between the HICRC and the FS/S
may be a measure of responsible gun ownership.
See the source below
WY, MT, VT, SD, ID have the largest positive difference of all 50 states.
CN, FL, VA, OH, NV have the largest negative difference of all 50 states.
55% Wyoming
51% Alaska
51% Idaho
49% Montana
44% Vermont
42% South Dakota
44% North Dakota
42% Maine
39% New Hampshire (less guns, more gun suicides)
31% Delaware (less guns, more gun suicides)

Source:
http://www.pubpol.duke.edu/people/faculty/cook/SAN01-25.pdf
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Kelton

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Re:State Hunting & Gun laws compared: Vermont best, Delaware worst.
« Reply #4 on: February 10, 2003, 05:04:22 pm »

These are interesting statistics,  I just read much of the report and their methods seem sound.  Interesting to note that the states which have the most responsible gun ownership also have some of the least restrictions on that ownership.  Which came first? --responsible gun ownership= greater freedom or greater freedom=more responsible gun ownership.  Probably a little of both.


Interesting note of where in the country the incidence of "dangerous gun shows" and frequent use of the "gun-show loophole" occurs:
http://gunfree.org/
 

The statistics shown at the site above are compiled by the BATF Crime Gun Analysis Branch.  If we knew how big the sales were at each of those gun shows, it might serve as another  proxy method of measurement of gun ownership among our candidate states, otherwise not too helpful, except to note that if # of gun shows is any measurement, WY, MT, ID, SD have a lot of shows for their population.



« Last Edit: February 11, 2003, 10:04:11 am by exitus »
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. . .the foundations of our national policy should be laid in private morality. If individuals be not influenced by moral principles, it is in vain to look for public virtue --The U.S. Senate's reply to George Washington's first inaugural address

Solitar

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Re:State Hunting & Gun laws compared: Vermont best, Delaware worst.
« Reply #5 on: February 11, 2003, 02:15:03 am »

Exitus,
Thanks for the links! That site is tedious to dig through. The site map helps.
http://gunfree.org/content/sitemap/frame_sitemap.html
Delaware seems an anomaly since it is so anti-concealed carry and rifles are not legal for hunting. Yet perhaps it is capitalizing on the markets in surrounding states (and thus gunshow customers running into a question of interstate transport -- like buying liquor in a low tax state across the border) OR there are a lot more guns owned that the other stats indicate -- which I kind of doubt for Delaware.

Number of Gun Shows per state per year.
State2000 pop.ShowsPop/showshows/100K
Wyoming0,493,78250009,87610.13
Montana0,902,19554016,70705.99
Idaho1,293,65349026,40103.79
South Dakota0,754,84427027,95703.58
Delaware0,783,60016048,97502.04
New Hampshire1,235,78617072,69301.38
Maine1,274,92314091,06601.10
North Dakota0,642,20007091,74301.09
Alaska0,626,93204156,73300.64
Vermont0,608,82703202,94200.49
Source:
http://gunfree.org/content/coalition/coal_gunshow_number.html


State laws regarding minimum ages for purchase and possession.
(Federal law prohibits firearms dealers from selling or delivering a shot gun or rifle, or ammunition for a shot gun or rifle, to any person the dealer knows or has reasonable cause to believe is under the age of 18. Dealers are prohibited from selling or delivering other firearms (e.g., handguns) or ammunition for those firearms to any person the dealer knows or has reasonable cause to believe is under the age of 21. Federal law provides less stringent age restrictions with respect to sales by unlicensed persons.  Unlicensed persons may not sell, deliver or otherwise transfer a handgun or handgun ammunition to any person the transferor knows or has reasonable cause to believe is under the age of 18.)
I question the following info regarding possession since these states allow hunting, even solo hunting, at much younger ages (see above posts). The FSP state data page and its subsidiary links do not address minimum age to purchase or possess.
http://www.distinctiveweb.com/gunlaws.htm

Purchase
Note that “None” simply lets the fed law suffice.
State   Handguns   Long guns
Maine   None   None
Vermont   None   Under 18
New Hampshire   18-20   None
Alaska:   18-20   Under 18
North Dakota   18-20   Under 18
Idaho:   Under 18   18 or older
Montana   18-20   18 or older
South Dakota   18-20   18 or older
Wyoming   21 or older   18 or older
Delaware   21 or older   18 or older

Possession
State   Handguns   Long guns
Maine   None   None
New Hampshire   None   None
Vermont   None   Under 18
Alaska:   Under 18-20   Under 18
Montana   18 or older   None
Idaho:   Under 18   18 or older
South Dakota   18 or older   None
North Dakota   18 or older   Under 18
Delaware   18 or older   Under 18
Wyoming   18 or older   18 or older

Bar on litigation against gun industry by state or local governments and individuals.
Montana, Alaska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Maine

Legislation pending for bar on litigation:
New Hampshire, Vermont, Delaware

No Bar on litigation
Wyoming, Idaho

Source:
http://gunfree.org/content/resources/frame_resc_laws.html
(click on State laws)
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Kelton

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Re:State Hunting & Gun laws compared: Vermont best, Delaware worst.
« Reply #6 on: February 11, 2003, 09:59:44 am »

Posted by: FreedomRoad
Quote
I am not saying you are wrong.  I never even looked this up, but I always heard that AK had the highest suicide rate in the United States.  I guess, it just sounded right.
--My sources are a little old, maybe you are right.
Note:
I've removed my little analysis on suicide/ gun-control.  I'm not sure it is relevant to this discussion, and we already have enough extraneous info as it is.  
« Last Edit: February 11, 2003, 10:01:35 am by exitus »
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Zxcv

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Re:State Hunting & Gun laws compared: Vermont best, Delaware worst.
« Reply #7 on: February 11, 2003, 07:30:18 pm »

I don't think the gun show numbers are very useful. That may have as much to do with geography as anything else. We don't know how many attend these shows.

I added the two gun ownership measures to the big spreadsheet.
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Joe

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Re:State Hunting & Gun laws compared: Vermont best, Delaware worst.
« Reply #8 on: April 13, 2003, 03:05:17 pm »

The FSP state data tables and the spreadsheet has rankings (included here in “ “ after the state name) for the states for “hunting laws”.  Below is more detailed info for resident hunters and fisherfolk. The primary criteria was minimum hunting age. Sunday prohibition and firearm restrictions were also factored in. But I'm compiling more detailed info for each state. I’ve started with Wyoming and New Hampshire. More info will follow. I'll post it here as I gather it together. The ratings likely will change.

To residents of these states, please let me know of any mistakes I may make in the summaries below.

Between Eastern and Western states there are major differences in licensing for big game. The game and fish departments try to balance game populations, habitat carrying capacity, winter & predator kill, and harvests by hunters. Some game in some states may be so plentiful or such a nuisance that nearly open hunting is allowed. Other game in other states may be so few compared to demand that only drawings/lotteries can "fairly" apportion the limited game available. A completely "free" and unregulated season would result in decimation or extinction of some wildlife. Thus game and habitat "management" is often necessary.

Eastern hunters may be used to buying a general hunting license which includes deer which can be taken anywhere in the state. Pheasant may be included with "small game and birds". Turkey and bear may require only an additional license/permit/tag and fee. Harvests are often controlled by the length of a season for specific game and thus may be extended or closed early. Quotas and thus limited numbers of permits may apply to female deer (does), moose, and elk. States may hold drawings for the latter two.

Western hunters may be used to a general license which may only be for small game and birds. Some or all big game may require an additional license/permit/tag and fee. Permits may be for specific areas or game management units instead of statewide. Quotas and thus limited numbers of permits may apply to any or all big game and even turkey and pheasants. States hold drawings to determine who gets a permit. Losers in the drawings may get "preferance points" for drawings in later years. Winners who bag some big game may be limited to one per several years or, for Wild Bison, one such taking in their lifetime.

Sources: The state links at:
http://www.huntfish.net/sportlaws.asp
Sunday Hunting:  http://www.hsus.org/ace/14131

Hunter Orange rankings (from the spreadsheet)
10 = AK, VT, ID, NH
5 = WY, SD
0 = ND, DE, MT, ME
« Last Edit: April 13, 2003, 08:24:24 pm by Joe (sequel to Solitar) »
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Joe

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Re:State Hunting & Gun laws compared: Vermont best, Delaware worst.
« Reply #9 on: April 13, 2003, 08:23:18 pm »

WYOMING  â€œ10”
No lower age limit - if they have a hunter safety certificate. No license under 14 for small game and fish. Under 14 for birds must be accompanied by adult. For big game: 12+. For bison: 14+.
License fees, resident:
Fishing: $25, youth 14-18: $3, under 14: no license or fee.
Hunting license fees below include $10 conservation stamp.  Archery: $20, Small Game or Game Bird: $20, Small Game and Game Bird: $25.  Additional fees: Black Bear: $30, Mountain Lion: $20, Elk: $38, Deer: $28, Antelope $25, Moose: $78, Bighorn Sheep: $78, Mountain Goat: $78, Turkey: $10, Bison: $283.
Firearms:
Quote
d. Firearms. Wyoming has no restrictive laws concerning the firearms which may be legally possessed. Firearms and cartridges which are legal for taking big or trophy game are described in the following paragraph: Wyoming statutes authorize the use of a firearm which has a barrel bore diameter of at least twenty-three-hundredths (23/100) of an inch and is chambered to fire a center-fire cartridge not less than two (2) inches in overall length, including a soft or expanding point bullet seated to a normal depth or a muzzle-loading rifle which has a barrel bore diameter of at least 40/100 of an inch and a charge of at least fifty (50) grains of black powder or equivalent, or a muzzle-loading specialty single shot handgun which has a barrel length of not less than ten (10) inches, a bore diameter of at least 45/100 of an inch and which propels a projectile of two hundred forty (240) grains at not less than five hundred (500) foot pounds at one hundred (100) yards. In addition, the Commission authorizes any other cartridge fired from a firearm that has a barrel bore diameter of at least thirty-five hundredths (.35) of an inch and the cartridge generally delivers at least five hundred (500) ft-pounds of impact at one hundred (100) yards and cartridges used are loaded with a lead, soft, or expanding point bullet.




VERMONT  â€œ10”
(Apparently no lower limit)



ALASKA  â€œ9”
Age limits: Under 16 - no hunting or fishing license or fee required. Only if for big game must under 10 be accompanied by adult.
License fees: Sport fishing: $15, King Salmon stamp: $10 extra. Trapping: $15, Hunting: $25, Hunting and Trapping: $39, Hunting and Sport Fishing: $39, Hunting, Trapping and Sport Fishing: $53. Additional permits/fees: Brown/Grizzly bear: $25, Muskox: $25 to $500. Non-residents pay big bucks for each permit for each species. Numerous “hunts” specify the species, sex, area, and sometimes weapons and the number of permits. The following is from the Alaska 2002-2003 Registration Permit Hunt Supplement.
Quote
• Listed inside are the 2002-2003 registration hunts. Some of these hunts have restrictions or specify types of weapons.
• Most registration permits will be issued during office hours throughout the season at designated ADF&G offices. Details are included in the description of each registration hunt. No fee is required.
• For most registration hunts an unlimited number of hunters may obtain permits. When the desired number of animals is harvested, the season will be closed by Emergency Order. Hunters with registration permits need to check with the appropraite ADF&G office before entering the field to ensure the season is still open. In some hunts, the total number of permits is limited, permits are limited to one per household, and permits are issued on a first-come, first-served basis at a designated location.
Firearms: no rimfire for big game except for swimming caribou.


MONTANA  â€œ9”
(Apparently no lower limit. At least 12 for big game.)
Hunter Safety and Education Certificate required: HB 396 as amended by Senate was passed by the Senate 33 to 17 on 04/04/03 the House 71 to 28 on 04/10/03 and awaits final Legislative action and signature by Governor.
Quote
An Act requiring any person who is born after January 1, 1985, to provide a certificate of completion from a Hunter Safety and Education Course before the persona may be issued a Montana hunting license; clarifying that the person issuing the license is required to determine proof of completion of the course; clarifying that the Montana Hunter Safety and Education Course is not limited to youths; and amending Section 87-2-105, MCA.
http://data.opi.state.mt.us/bills/2003/billhtml/HB0396.htm


IDAHO  â€œ7”
(10 & 11 okay for small game. 12+ for big game. Semi-auto rifles are okay.)



MAINE  â€œ5”
(Under 10 no hunting. 10+ for small game. 16+ for big game (may change to 14+) NO SUNDAY HUNTING)



NORTH DAKOTA  â€œ3”
(No lower limit. Under 15 must be accompanied. 14+ for big game.)



NEW HAMPSHIRE  â€œ2”
For hunting: No lower age limit and no license if accompanied by 18+ adult. 16+ for license.
License fees, (Habitat fee of $2.50 included in following hunting licenses). Resident: Hunting $24.50 (includes deer tag), Hunt&Fish: $48.50 (includes deer tag). Fishing (not required under age 16): $35. Salmon: $10 (free under age 16), Clam (age 6+): $30, Oyster (all ages): $30. Additional licenses/fees: Moose: $100, Pheasant $16, Duck: $4, Turkey: $6, Bear: $5, Trapper: $28.50, Trapper under 16: $6.50.
Small game (included in resident hunting license or, for non-residents, a specific small game license) is defined as: snowshoe hare, cottontail rabbits, gray squirrel, pheasant, quail, grouse, chuckar, European partridge & migratory birds. Wildlife with no closed season (but a hunting license is required) coyote, weasel, porcupine, red squirrel, wild boar, skunk, woodchuck, European starlings, feral pigeons and English sparrows.
In many specified towns of southeastern New Hampshire deer hunting is allowed only by shotgun, muzzleloader, hand-guns in calibers .357 Magnum, 10mm Automatic, .41 Remington, .44 Magnum, .45 Long colt or .480 Ruger, or bow and arrow (in other words, like DE, no rifles).
Quote
It is unlawful to • hunt deer or bear with: 1) a .22 caliber rimfire firearm, 2) a single barrel, single shot muzzleloader less than .40 caliber, 3) a bow of less than 40 lbs. pull at 28 inches or less draw, 4) or an arrow without name and address and a fixed blade broadhead less than 7/8 inches wide or more than 1-1/2 inches wide, or retractable blade broadheads less than 7/8 inches when open,; • hunt deer with birdshot, or shot smaller than 00 buckshot; • hunt bear with a shotgun using other than a single projectile;



SOUTH DAKOTA  â€œ1”
(At least 12 to hunt.)


DELAWARE  â€œ0”
(Under 12 must be accompanied by an adult. For deer licenses they must be at least 12. rifles not permitted!  Small game is limited to bow, shotgun, and .22 pistol only in final kill in traps. Deer is limited to bow, shotgun, crossbow, and muzzle loaders. Note that Delaware recognizes no legal hunting use for any rifle (other than muzzle loaders). This could be a "no pass" for rifle owners. NO SUNDAY HUNTING)
« Last Edit: April 14, 2003, 11:43:16 am by Joe (sequel to Solitar) »
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Zxcv

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Re:State Hunting & Gun laws compared.
« Reply #10 on: April 15, 2003, 11:08:23 am »

I notice you upgraded AK a point from what we have in the big spreadsheet.

If the governor in Montana signs that hunter ed law, then it will be like all the other states, so I will remove that row in the big spreadsheet. If you are monitoring that, Joe, let me know.
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Re:State Hunting & Gun laws compared.
« Reply #11 on: August 12, 2003, 12:52:18 pm »

The best time to teach kids freedom, responsibility, and the Right to Keep and Bear Arms is when they are youngsters. Letting them carry a gun and hunt by themselves or with friends of the same age is a hugely important rite of passage. To anyone who has kids wanting to hunt with a gun, or to kids of age 12, these limits in each state are super important. Being able to let your kids go hunting for squirrels, rabbits or varmints with a .22 or .410 at age 8 by themselves is, well, I can't describe it with words that do it justice. You would either have had to been such a kid or been a proud mom or dad seeing their kid strike off through the woods or fields.
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Re:State Hunting & Gun laws compared.
« Reply #12 on: August 12, 2003, 05:46:51 pm »


 Also consider that, even though Alaska, Wyoming and North Dakota are “shall issue”, the training requirement and list of prohibited places are effective disincentives to apply for permits -- as can be seen by the low proportion of people who actually end up getting permits.

Your Alaska data is outdated. Alaska has Vermont style carry laws....

Permits are not required, but may be applied for in order to be able to have a CCW in states that will honor Alaska permits.

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Re:State Hunting & Gun laws compared.
« Reply #13 on: August 19, 2003, 04:48:23 pm »

For a hunter, nothing compares with Alaska.

Period.



Some photos from inside Alaska's largest urban area
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Re:State Hunting & Gun laws compared.
« Reply #14 on: August 19, 2003, 05:29:44 pm »


Your Alaska data is outdated. Alaska has Vermont style carry laws....

Since we somehow got talking about concealed carry on a thread entitled "State Hunting & Gun laws compared" I will gladly mention that in most of the ideal hunting locations in Idaho, you are free to carry concealed-carry without a permit, if you are so inclined  :)   Most hunters I know go out with rifles, but hey --if that is your method, and you've got a powerful enough of a pistol to actually hunt game with (hopefully it also has laser sights), then feel free if your hunting location is outside of city limits and other select locations where Idaho law only applies to within those locations in its requirement to have a permit to carry concealed.
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. . .the foundations of our national policy should be laid in private morality. If individuals be not influenced by moral principles, it is in vain to look for public virtue --The U.S. Senate's reply to George Washington's first inaugural address
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