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Author Topic: End Public Schools  (Read 6133 times)

BrianMcCandliss

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End Public Schools
« on: August 24, 2005, 08:20:42 pm »

End Public Schools

While the arguments for and against public schools are many, the simple fact is that they continue to exist, and do not appear to promise ending anytime soon under current circumstances.
The reason for this, is simple: most people perceive a benefit from public schools, believing that private schools would cost them more, if public schools were abolished.

Here is how this reasoning works:
Parents view their perceived "share of payment" for public schools, to be only their local school-taxes paid on their property. The remainder, they believe, is contributed by others by "pooling" from all of society, thus rendering only a small payment from each taxpaying person or business. They then compare their own individual perceived "payment," to the average annual cost of private schools, and think that they are getting a "great bargain" in comparison, with "society" providing an education valued in the high four-figure range (or in some cases, the low five-figures).

The problem with this reasoning, is that it's an illusion founded entirely on junk-economics. In reality, parents pay all of it-- on average paying upwards of $8,000 per year-- for every child they have in the school-system; this is paid via "hidden costs" that far exceed their perceived "share" of public-school funding. In other words, they don't see the payments, but they do feel them at the end of the month.

To understand how public schools impose hidden costs on parents, it's necessary first to understand how school-funding works.
Schools are funded by government, which receives its funding from various federal, state and local taxes. Naturally, only a portion of this amount comes from local school-taxes which are paid by parents: the remainder is paid by state and federal taxes, as well as local school-taxes paid by businesses.
Since businesses make their money entirely by selling to consumers (i.e. the parents), then taxes on businesses are simply paid entirely by parents in the form of higher prices on consumer-purchases; as a result, all school-funding paid by businesses, is simply passed on to parents.
 Likewise, school-funding from state and federal taxes, are also paid by parents in the form of higher rates of these taxes as well.

As a result, government-funded schools save parents nothing in comparison to simply paying for private schools outright; in fact, inefficiency and lack of price-competition, ensures that public schools cost more than would private schools of equal quality, if all schools were private. Even the fact that these costs are spread out over the parent's entire lifetime, is more than offset by accounting for interest-expenses, whereby a parent would pay an average lower monthly rate via simple long-term financing.

As a result, parents pay an average of over $8000.00 per child, per year for public schools; this amount could easily fund a private-school education of equal quality, or go a good ways towards one of even better quality (or simply home-school, whereby a family with three children could reap an after-tax savings of $24,000/year): the choice is the parent's. Likewise, price-competition would force average private-school tuitions to plummet, once public schools were abolished.  The only thing necessary for parents to gain this benefit, is to simply end public schools.

And the way to end public schools, is to simply inform the mainstream population of the fact, that public-school benefits are a complete fraud-- a hoax to promise benefits which it cannot possibly deliver. Once the majority learns that public schools pose them no financial benefit in comparison to private schools, the natural response will be to vote for the abolition of public schools.
This can be accomplished without problem, via a program whereby all public schools will simply be closed by a certain date, thus giving parents the opportunity to arrange and schedule alternative private means of education-- in addition to allowing public-school staff to arrange alternate employment.

[Feel free to circulate this]
« Last Edit: August 25, 2005, 04:48:29 pm by BrianMcCandliss »
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Gabo

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Re: End Public Schools
« Reply #1 on: August 25, 2005, 12:58:39 am »

<----- Victim of the Government Indoctrination System
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BrianMcCandliss

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Re: End Public Schools
« Reply #2 on: October 29, 2005, 02:04:21 pm »

The US is not a country-- the STATES are countries. It's no coincidence that public schools took off AFTER the Civil War, when this fact was supressed; no state would dare implement such abuse of power over its citizens, while the other states were watching over their shoulder instead of Big Brother.
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Ward Griffiths

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Re: End Public Schools
« Reply #3 on: October 29, 2005, 04:30:19 pm »

The first tax-paid public schools started in Massachusetts almost 30 years before Lincoln's war.  Feral government didn't get involved to any serious degree until the 1890s, by which time a lot of states had started their own flavors.
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BrianMcCandliss

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Re: End Public Schools
« Reply #4 on: November 01, 2005, 12:30:13 am »

The first tax-paid public schools started in Massachusetts almost 30 years before Lincoln's war.  Feral government didn't get involved to any serious degree until the 1890s, by which time a lot of states had started their own flavors.
Actually, it started in 1852-- less than TEN years; likewise, the reception of compulsory schooling was far from a warm one.

Here's the actual 1852 law:

1852

Chapter 240

An Act Concerning the Attendance of Children at School

Be it enacted by the Senate and the House of Representatives

Section 1. Every person who shall have any child under his control between the ages of eight and fouteen years, shall send such child to some public school within the town or city in which he resides, during at least twelve weeks, if the public schools within such town or city shall be so long kept, in each and every year during which such child shall be under his control, six weeks of which shall be consecutive.

Section 2. (Describes fine of $20 for truancy)

Section 3. It shall be the duty of the school committee in the several towns or cities to inquire into all cases of violation of the first section of this act, and to ascertain of the persons violating the same, the reasons, if any, for such violation and they shall report such cases, together with such reasons, if any, to the town or city in their annual report; but they shall not report any cases such as are provided for by the fourth section of this act.

Section 4. If, upon inquiry by the school committee, it shall appear, or if upon th etrial of any complaint or indictment under this act it shall appear, that such child has attended some school, not in the town or city in which he resides, for the time required by this act, or has been otherwise furnished with the means of education for a like period of time, or has already acquired those branches of learning which are taught in common schools, [also describes physical incapacity or poverty as being valid excuses for absence from school] shall not be held to have violated the provisions of this act.

Section 5. It shall be the duty of the treasurer of the town or city to prosecute all violations of this act.

As such, this is what such laws SHOULD be: a simple requirement that a parent provide a minimal education for every child.

After the Civil War, however the walls began closing in as the governments began "feeling their oats" under limitless power, and laws became more and more demanding and strict; truancy began carrying criminal penalties, while by the 1880's children were forced to school by the Massachusetts militia.
Other states did likewise, with the Supreme Court upholding compulsory-attendance and truancy laws under the doctrine of "Parens Patriae," while denying the presumption of innocence.

Simply put, compulsory-attendance laws became nothing more than government-slavery, along with military conscription; as federal case-law shows, the 13th amendment applies only to chattel-slavery in the private sector, while human freedom is mere privilege subject to revocation by goverment.
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