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Author Topic: House plans  (Read 14080 times)

MaineShark

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Re: House plans
« Reply #15 on: September 07, 2006, 07:33:48 pm »

Just wanted to bump this up and let people know that I'm going to be starting this up, so if anyone is interested, let me know.  I'll negotiate pricing on a case-by-case basis, and the first few are definitely going to get a "thanks for helping me get started" discount.

Joe
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dalebert

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Re: House plans
« Reply #16 on: September 07, 2006, 08:18:34 pm »

It will be at least a year or two before I'm able to move, but I'm definately interested. I need to stay in touch.

maxparrish

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Re: House plans
« Reply #17 on: September 08, 2006, 06:07:31 pm »

Just wanted to bump this up and let people know that I'm going to be starting this up, so if anyone is interested, let me know.  I'll negotiate pricing on a case-by-case basis, and the first few are definitely going to get a "thanks for helping me get started" discount.

Joe

I am putting togeather ideas for housing - although for New Hampshire it may be need modifications.  I have drawn several floorplans - might I forward a file and get a quote/guestimate for in or out-of-state design?  How about consulting?

What format would you like the file in? DXF, WMF, EMF? Or just a JPG...for the quote (its about 1000 sq feet, single story)?  (PS Can you do SIPS)



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MaineShark

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Re: House plans
« Reply #18 on: September 09, 2006, 08:40:14 am »

I am putting togeather ideas for housing - although for New Hampshire it may be need modifications.  I have drawn several floorplans - might I forward a file and get a quote/guestimate for in or out-of-state design?  How about consulting?

What format would you like the file in? DXF, WMF, EMF? Or just a JPG...for the quote (its about 1000 sq feet, single story)?  (PS Can you do SIPS)

JPG would be fine.  I like to re-draw plans before working with them, anyway.

I've never really dealt with SIPS, but I may do more along those lines, in the future.

Joe
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"An armed society is a polite society" - this does not mean that we are polite because we fear each other.

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Quantrill

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Re: House plans
« Reply #19 on: November 04, 2006, 01:43:22 pm »

With all the experience in construction trades on here, has anyone considered starting a PORC construction company?  Could be profitable, as well as helping future movers find housing (I'm sure FSP members would rather purchase a home from other PORCs as opposed to strangers).  Seems like a doable idea to me.
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Ward Griffiths

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Re: House plans
« Reply #20 on: November 04, 2006, 11:07:10 pm »

I'm sure FSP members would rather purchase a home from other PORCs as opposed to strangers.
Depends.  If it's a nice house owned by statists moving out of New Hampshire, no problem.
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freedominnh

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Re: House plans
« Reply #21 on: November 10, 2006, 09:10:51 pm »

What is beautiful about SIP's is you are forced to chase almost everything. You can not beat the flexibility of such open floor plans.

I also work with builders who only use LTVL "silent floors" in stick-built construction.    Ron Helwig's home is built with LTVL's.    You can actually cut chases through if someone gaffed on a plumbing fixture. 

Had done production work with SIP's.  Would be willing to co-venture SIP homes.  Have experienced SIP CAD designer available. 
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Ear

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Re: House plans
« Reply #22 on: November 12, 2006, 05:35:22 pm »

I'd like to get my hands on some good professional blueprints for geodesic dome-based homes.  I specifically say 'geodesic' because I don't like the Monolithic style of concrete dome, I want a wooden R. Buckminster Fuller type of structure.

For those of you who aren't aware of the advantages of domes, they are many.  For starters, a dome (well, OK, a sphere) encloses the largest volume of space using the smallest amount of materials of any structure.  This makes it not only cost-effective in terms of buying building materials, but also cost-effective in that there is proportionally less surface area to exchange heat... thus heating in the winter and cooling in the summer is maximally efficient, and you can afford to build a much bigger house than you would with boxy conventional designs.  Geodesic domes are also inherently strong, incredibly so in fact... and with as much snow as NH gets, you do want a nice strong roof.  Construction is extemely simple, compared to traditional living structures.  And hey, dome houses look really great!
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Dreepa

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Re: House plans
« Reply #23 on: November 12, 2006, 07:10:32 pm »

I'd like to get my hands on some good professional blueprints for geodesic dome-based homes.  I specifically say 'geodesic' because I don't like the Monolithic style of concrete dome, I want a wooden R. Buckminster Fuller type of structure.

I think that there is a thread about dome houses over on NHFREE.com
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MaineShark

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Re: House plans
« Reply #24 on: February 24, 2009, 03:58:15 pm »

Just to bring this back up, I've been talking with some realtors and folks who have expressed an interest in moving, and playing with some plans in my spare time.  I have a few interesting designs available, and can customize as needed.

One interesting plan is a small house with 800+ square feet on the main floor, a similarly-sized basement/walkout garage, and a second floor that can be varied in size, anywhere from about 1/3 of the main floor's size, all the way to being 100% of the main floor's size.

An attached or detached storage shed can supply substantial space to store possessions, without increasing the taxable living area, or creating additional space that needs to be heated.

The design can also be modified to work as a passive-solar setup with the addition of a roofed porch to screen the windows from sun during the summer, and also has substantial roof area available for active solar (water-heating or electric).

Its heating-energy demand is low enough that several can be built on one property, and heated by a single, large wood-fired boiler (housed in one building, on its own, or as part of a storage building).  Heat energy can be metered just like water or electricity, so each building's occupants can be responsible for their portion of the heating bill, or it can be run on the honor system.

Anyway, that's one particular plan, but pretty much anything is possible.

Joe
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"An armed society is a polite society" - this does not mean that we are polite because we fear each other.

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CurtHowland

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Re: House plans
« Reply #25 on: February 24, 2009, 04:58:59 pm »

I love houses, and having one built to my needs is a dream I may never be able to fulfill, but thanks for letting me dream it.

Were I building, I would want to go the "maximum green" path. No, I don't mean "watermellon"  >:D I mean great insulation, an eye toward passive solar, sky-lights, intelligent infrastructure, etc.

Like others, my primary study is not houses, it's electrical engineering and data networking. But that also means that I don't mind putting real thought into layout and facilities, since I'd do exactly the same thing for a datacenter.

Have you seen the designs coming out of Germany, where the outside wall is un-penetrated by anything but windows, and there is a 2-inch space between the inner wall and the drywall, so that wiring can be run behind it without compromising the insulation/vapor barrier? They are saying that with a good heat-exchanging furnace, it has to run more for oxygen than for heating, since lighting and body heat are enough to keep the place pretty warm.

My thermostat is set for 64 right now to try to avoid $300/mo heating bills here in North Carolina, where I'm lucky even to have fiberglass blown into the rafters. And cooling in summer is just as expensive!

I figure the smart design will more than pay for itself. New Hampshire winters seem to me to be reason enough to make it worth while. But again, I'm not a builder.

Thoughts?
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CurtHowland

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Re: House plans
« Reply #26 on: February 24, 2009, 05:05:48 pm »

Just to fantasize a bit more, the "basement garage" idea is a good one. One place I lived was on a hillside, and was built this way. %100 garage, with a large deck over the entrance, south facing, two stories of all glass with an upper deck for summer shade.

Worked _great_ for solar heating in winter, even though it wasn't seriously insulated.

The garage stayed nice a cool through summer, and since it was the size of the entire house it could do both duties of a garage, storage of cars and storage of stuff!
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WendellBerry

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Re: House plans
« Reply #27 on: February 24, 2009, 05:27:06 pm »

I built a 3K sqft passive solar, super-insulated home on the eastern shore of Lake Sunapee.

I heated with a hydro-air system hooked up to my hot water tank. Cost me $600 for heat and hot water.

Shingle style look from outside.

R60 roof (hot roof)
R30 walls (ventilated rain screen)
R20 basement walls
R10 underslab
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MaineShark

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Re: House plans
« Reply #28 on: February 24, 2009, 05:58:14 pm »

Like others, my primary study is not houses, it's electrical engineering and data networking. But that also means that I don't mind putting real thought into layout and facilities, since I'd do exactly the same thing for a datacenter.

With modern systems, knowing EE and networking is a plus.  We have some systems now which use networked computers pulling data from indoor and outdoor sensors, as well as weather forecasts, to control the heating, cooling, humidification, dehumidification, ventilation, and filtration, all in a coordinated fashion, to maximize comfort and minimize energy usage.

Have you seen the designs coming out of Germany, where the outside wall is un-penetrated by anything but windows, and there is a 2-inch space between the inner wall and the drywall, so that wiring can be run behind it without compromising the insulation/vapor barrier? They are saying that with a good heat-exchanging furnace, it has to run more for oxygen than for heating, since lighting and body heat are enough to keep the place pretty warm.

I've seen those sorts of designs.  Personally, I think the same overall wall thickness, insulated fully (no open airspace), and with built-in conduits/chases for the wiring is a better design.  It's easy enough to run a couple 1.5" or 2" PVC pipes inside the wall (one for power, one for data) and then seal around them while insulating.  Then, any future upgrades are just a matter of snaking wires (I'd actually leave nylon strings in place, allowing for easy snaking).

I figure the smart design will more than pay for itself. New Hampshire winters seem to me to be reason enough to make it worth while. But again, I'm not a builder.

Yup.  You only get one chance (practically, anyway) with many of these items (like insulating under and around the foundation, for example), so cheaping out on that during construction is a bad idea.

I built a 3K sqft passive solar, super-insulated home on the eastern shore of Lake Sunapee.

I heated with a hydro-air system hooked up to my hot water tank. Cost me $600 for heat and hot water.

Didn't we go over that, a few years ago?

You have a Trianco Heatmaker HW, if I recall correctly.  That's a gas-fired residential boiler, not a "hot water tank."  It's also one of the flat-out worst boilers ever made, both in terms of reliability and efficiency, FYI.  Fortunately, most of them have ended up being replaced, by now, because they are a maintenance nightmare.  Even the worst of modern boilers beat them in reliability, and anything above the very bottom of the barrel beats them in efficiency.  I have one sitting in my scrap pile, right now, actually.  The owners got sick of it breaking all the time, and the high fuel bills.  We installed a modern oil boiler and cut their fuel bills in half.  Personally, I prefer biomass, but not everyone wants that, so sometimes we end up installing oil...

Joe
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"An armed society is a polite society" - this does not mean that we are polite because we fear each other.

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WendellBerry

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Re: House plans
« Reply #29 on: February 24, 2009, 06:41:54 pm »

Quote
You have a Trianco Heatmaker HW, if I recall correctly.

Installed 12 yrs ago. I no longer own the house.

Needed sealed combustion. Wanted condensing unit. Needed very small size btu output.

Quote
That's a gas-fired residential boiler, not a "hot water tank."

Actually both but primarily it was for hot water usage for me.

http://www.allheatingparts.com/Heatmaker-H-Series-Boiler.html

Quote
in terms of reliability and efficiency

I didn't have any problems. 87% AFUE for non-condensing unit.







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