Free State Project Forum

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Pages: 1 [2]   Go Down

Author Topic: Small Business Friendly States  (Read 18597 times)

Michelle

  • FSP Participant
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 748
Re:Small Business Friendly States
« Reply #15 on: November 01, 2002, 08:49:20 am »

I have friends who actually drive here (NH) from NY and NJ (5-7 hours) SEVERAL TIMES every year for major shopping trips. Also, about 15 years ago I was living in Maine, about 1.5 hours from the NH border and nearly everyone made the trip into NH every weekend to shop. Of course those people closer to the border don't even think twice about it, everything is purchased in NH.
Logged
Please join NHLA today! http://www.nhliberty.org With every new member we gain political weight to support liberty-friendly candidates and promote liberty throughout NH.
Support the Liberty Scholarship Fund. Please make a donation today! http://www.lsfund.org

cathleeninsc

  • Guest
Re:Small Business Friendly States
« Reply #16 on: November 01, 2002, 01:19:56 pm »

I can see that privatization is going to be our biggest challenge. One thing that is beginning to happen in local government services is outsourcing. It might be a useful first step toward privatization. A Canadian firm, CGI, has a business unit expanding in this area having taken over some employment and training functions for several Ohio counties. This can introduce effeciencies thus reducing the tax burdens. If successful then privatization is a smaller leap.

Cathleen in SC
Logged

Solitar

  • Guest
Re:Small Business Friendly States
« Reply #17 on: December 22, 2002, 08:15:44 am »

Adam3 wrote:
Quote
I agree that North Dakota would be an easy state to change, and has the added benefit of the locals welcoming us as a population and economic boost. I would like to bring up 3 additional points that argue for North Dakota.
1. The population decline of North Dakota is in large part due to a stagnant economy (not positive). However because people are fleeing, the state is slowly descending into a hellish cesspool. If we move in and increase the population of Jeffersonians, elect our own representatives and cut regulations, privatise, and do away with several taxes, businesses will flock to our state and thus drive the economy forward. Soon the citizens of North Dakota will join our experiment in full, ( meaning less government in all aspects of life), and we will get the credit for saving North Dakota.  Soon South Dakota, Montana, Idaho, and Wyoming will all join in and freedom will spread across the country and then the world!
above from over on the New State Population estimates 2002 version thread
http://forum.freestateproject.org/index.php?board=5;action=display;threadid=1096
I responded with more of how local governments stifle their own economies over on the
Gov't Planning in the Free State - knowing what we are up against. thread
http://forum.freestateproject.org/index.php?board=20;action=display;threadid=507
Quote
I agree that North Dakota should welcome the FSP with open arms. You would think that economic depression would be an incentive for local and state government become business friendly and thus to let small or any business help. Don't count on it. Like the Soviet Union and other ecomomies failing because of too much government interference, the too common reaction is more darn government regulation and planning!

As noted on page one of this thread, the Gross State Product indicates that the economies of North Dakota, Montana, and Maine are bad (and the first two are getting worse -- at least from on site reports). That the Small Business Survival Index for these three states also is the worst of the candidate states is no coincidence. (Vermont's is also bad but its location let's it get away with it - yet it could improve so much!).

Wyoming several years ago made a concerted effort to make its business environment more friendly. Where it started from I do not know, but that it has a good GSP and SBSI may mean they've improved a lot.

Of Wyoming's neighbors which are candidate states, only South Dakota is more business friendly - yet South Dakota's GSP is worse. Why is a good question;  there may be a limit on just how much a good SBSI can help. Yet these states certainly could get much better with FSP help. Which state deserves that help? Which state would most appreciate that help?
Logged

Zxcv

  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1229
Re:Small Business Friendly States
« Reply #18 on: December 23, 2002, 12:24:51 am »

Quote
There are two ways to interpret the above data:
1. Seek out that state which can most benefit from the free market minarchist ideas the FSP will attempt to implement.
2. Seek out the most prosperous state which still meets the general criteria of the FSP, so as to prosper as soon as possible and have a strong economy into which we can integrate.

It is clear from the data which states fall into which of the above two approaches. MT is the frontrunner in category 1. NH appears to be the best contender in category 2.

However, I must admit that I am unsure which path will yeild the best long term results. I am curious what others think- should the FSP select a state which would most benefit from its economic principles, or should we choose to move to a state where we can begin to prosper as soon as we hit the ground?

Everyone is interested in a strong economy, especially in these times. Given that fact, it would be a great loss for us to jump into a state with an already-strong economy. We could not say to the rest of the country, "Look how freedom makes an economy healthy!" That is, we couldn't take credit for it. Why would we want to bypass such an opportunity? If I'm not mistaken, the FSP is not only about making a single state free, but also about influencing other states to take similar measures.

However, even if we go to a state with an economy that needs help, we should be careful which one. We need to have a realistic chance to turn around whatever factors are depressing it.
Logged

freedomroad

  • Guest
Re:Small Business Friendly States
« Reply #19 on: March 18, 2003, 11:02:16 pm »

Is Wyoming small business friendly?

Pro-Business Environment- According to the Economic Freedom Index, Wyoming has more economic freedom than eight of the other candidate states.  The Index ranks Wyoming better than New Hampshire, Delaware, Montana, or Alaska.  The 2002 Small Business Survival Index ranks Wyoming as the third best state for small businesses in the entire country.  Wyoming bests such states as Florida, New Hampshire, Texas, and Delaware.  The candidate states of Idaho, North Dakota, Montana, Vermont, and Maine are all ranked as part of the worst twenty-five states in the country for small businesses.  Expansion Management Magazine ranked Cheyenne as a Five Star Community for quality of life.  The Expansion Management Magazine report was written so that small to mid-sized companies would have a basis to compare different cities for relocation proposes.  

Many people have companies that are financial, electronic, or mail order related.  No matter which state is picked, the profits of these companies will not change much.  However, the dollars made from the company will mean less in Alaska or New Hampshire than they will mean in Wyoming, because of its low cost of living.  Likewise, if one of these companies moves from New Hampshire or Delaware to Wyoming, the dollars will be worth more and the company owner will be able to help the FSP out to a greater degree.  Most business owners prefer a general sales tax, like Wyoming has, to personal and corporate income taxes, like New Hampshire, Idaho, Montana, Alaska, and Vermont have.  Businesses find that sales taxes are easier to comply with than personal and corporate income taxes.  This is because sales taxes are straightforward and easy to understand, unlike corporate tax laws.  

According to the Fiduciary Group, Delaware and Wyoming are the only two candidate states that have a worldwide reputation for being business friendly.  See the Fiduciary Group’s report on Wyoming.  Here is another report, which indicates Wyoming is better than Delaware and Nevada for LLCs.  In 1977, Wyoming became the first state to authorize Limited Liability Corporations.  Wyoming has some of the most liberal LLC laws in the country and continues to attract both national and international companies.

Regulation- Wyoming is much less regulated than most states.  Wyoming has many advantages for companies, in addition to being personal and corporate income tax free.  You do not even have to get a business license in many parts of Wyoming.  For example, Johnson County with Buffalo and Kaycee has no business license requirements.  Many of Wyoming’s counties do not have building codes.  Even some of the towns such as, Newcastle and Kaycee, Wyoming, do not have building codes.  On top of that, many of the other towns in Wyoming, the towns that have building codes, just follow the Universal Building Codes guidelines.  The northeastern states, especially New Hampshire and Maine, have many nineteen-century farmhouses.  Many people want to see these houses preserved even if it means that property owners cannot renovate the houses, as they see fit.  Environmental regulations are hurting the mining business in Montana, the fishery and logging businesses in Maine, and even the housing market in Vermont.
Logged

Zxcv

  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1229
Re:Small Business Friendly States
« Reply #20 on: March 19, 2003, 02:10:29 am »

I have 3 comprehensive economic indices in the large spreadsheet, EFI, SBSI and EFNA (I've just updated the SBSI numbers by the way - I had had the 2001 numbers previously). I weighted all 3 equally and put no weigh on any other variable. The result was:

SD 28.41 (out of a possible 30, pretty damn impressive)
WY 25.21
NH 24.94
DE 23.73
ID 22.82
ND 19.82
VT 19.37
MT 19.31
AK 19.01
ME 17.72 (will someone please put this state out of its misery?)

Additionally, the EFNA has a running series starting with 1981. It is interesting to note that WY had first place of these 10 states in that index in '81, falling to 5th place 4 years later. Something stupid obviously happened in the legislature at that point!  :P  It's now in 4th place still, in that index.

I have this long-term EFNA graphed out in the big spreadsheet. I should go back and graph the other two if they have been running for a while. It's obviously more impressive if you can keep a top number for years; it takes consistency to draw business in. I noticed in this one-year update of SBSI I just did, that ND and DE swapped places (DE was 7th place and ND 5th, now DE is 5th and ND 7th).
Logged

exitus

  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 180
  • To face freedom, turn 180º from tyranny.
    • Mercados libres y paz: El Cato Institute
Re:Small Business Friendly States
« Reply #21 on: March 19, 2003, 10:43:53 am »

Zxcv,
Here's an article where the author tries to integrate the factors of the Small Business Survival Committee (SBSC) and Cognetics rankings (this was brought up earlier in another thread months ago)  :

http://www.bcentral.com/articles/harper/141.asp

Good for discussing how to look at the different criteria that those two different ratings use.

Not surprisingly, his rankings of the states from the 10 worst, working up from the bottom:

#49  = Maine
#46  = Montana
#45  = North Dakota
#43 = Vermont
Logged
". . .the foundations of our national policy should be laid in private morality. If individuals be not influenced by moral principles, it is in vain to look for public virtue” -- U.S. Senate's reply to George Washington's first inaugural address

Zxcv

  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1229
Re:Small Business Friendly States
« Reply #22 on: March 19, 2003, 10:35:58 pm »

I've seen it. I didn't bother with Cognetics because I assume there are other reasons for lack of enterpreneurial activity besides statist government (otherwise SD wouldn't do so bad on the Cognetics list). I don't think we are concerned with these other reasons. We just want government out of our hair.
Logged

Hank

  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 334
  • "The Men That Don't Fit In"
Re:Small Business Friendly States
« Reply #23 on: August 25, 2003, 02:44:01 pm »

Quote
SD 28.41 (out of a possible 30, pretty damn impressive)
;D ;D ;D
« Last Edit: August 25, 2003, 02:44:39 pm by Hank »
Logged
There's A race of men that don't fit in,
A race that can't stay still;
So they break the hearts of kith and kin,
And they roam the world at will.
http://www.internal.org/view_poem.phtml?poemID=295
Pages: 1 [2]   Go Up