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Author Topic: Off-Grid Homestead Subdivision  (Read 14409 times)

Pat McCotter

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Re:Off-Grid Homestead Subdivision
« Reply #15 on: November 23, 2004, 06:53:30 pm »

Off-grid - not connected to the utility wires; producing your own electricity

Pat
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lloydbob1

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Re:Off-Grid Homestead Subdivision
« Reply #16 on: November 23, 2004, 07:03:23 pm »

Diesel Generator running on grease?
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George Reich

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Re:Off-Grid Homestead Subdivision
« Reply #17 on: November 23, 2004, 07:57:00 pm »

Off-grid - not connected to the utility wires; producing your own electricity

Either that or using no electricity at all. I have a friend in Wells, Maine who lives perfectly well without electricity and has done so for years. This must be hard to imagine for most who are accustomed to having electricity, but she considers this lifestyle to be incredibly liberating.
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George Reich

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Re:Off-Grid Homestead Subdivision
« Reply #18 on: November 23, 2004, 08:40:15 pm »

Diesel Generator running on grease?

Wind, photovoltaics, and microhydro would be much more common, I think.
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lloydbob1

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Re:Off-Grid Homestead Subdivision
« Reply #19 on: November 23, 2004, 10:08:08 pm »

Good wind and hydro aren't available everywhere.  While photvoltaics get cheaper every day, I've been looking at this stuff for a long time and I don't see it catching on in any big way.
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George Reich

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Re:Off-Grid Homestead Subdivision
« Reply #20 on: November 23, 2004, 10:32:52 pm »

Good wind and hydro aren't available everywhere.

Well, some consideration needs to be given to site selection before building an off-grid home.  ;)

Quote
While photvoltaics get cheaper every day, I've been looking at this stuff for a long time and I don't see it catching on in any big way.

I don't either, but some people enjoy the idea of being off the grid so much that they will use them even if the economics are not there.

One thing that surprised me when I started looking into renewable energy is the wide variety of microhydro systems available for very small streams (as little as 3 gpm and a 25 foot drop). Apparently the cost per watt produced is about 1/10 that of photovoltaics, and these systems are much more reliable as well.



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DC

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Re:Off-Grid Homestead Subdivision
« Reply #21 on: November 23, 2004, 11:26:49 pm »

Quote
One thing that suprised me when I started looking into renewable energy is the wide variety of microhydro systems available for very small streams.

Would these work in New Hampshire in the winter or would they freeze up?
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George Reich

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Re:Off-Grid Homestead Subdivision
« Reply #22 on: November 27, 2004, 07:08:17 pm »

Would these work in New Hampshire in the winter or would they freeze up?

From what I can gather, this depends upon the particulars of the site and especially the depth of the water in the inlet area.
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dghizzoni

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Re: Off-Grid Homestead Subdivision
« Reply #23 on: April 08, 2005, 11:14:49 pm »

I had been kicking this idea around for several years. One possibility of community revenue to support common areas is Selling green tags from the comunities generated renewable energy.   http://mainstayenergy.com/modules.php?name=News&file=article&sid=4

A FSP developement company would be an excellent idea. Profit driven for other homes and at or close to cost for FSP'rs. As a custom cabinetmaker I'd love to hear more about the possibilities. I've been trying to work out what kind of renewable mix would be necessary for running a full cabinet shop off the grid. It would be a project that would certainly bring some attention to the FSP also.

Not a member yet, but seriously concidering it. Was getting ready to move to MA from RI but don't want to give up my guns  ;D Found this site and have been perusing the boards..... Liking NH more by the thread.
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ke6ziu

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Re: Off-Grid Homestead Subdivision
« Reply #24 on: April 16, 2005, 02:54:45 am »

Here is an idea I've been kicking around for a few months now.  I was thinking of locating a parcel of undeveloped land, perhaps 200 acres or more, to purchase for the purpose of subdividing into smaller parcels for people who want to go off-grid and build their own dwellings and live in a rural setting away from the established towns and cities.  I know from reading the forums for the past several months that there is some interest in off-grid or "Homestead" living as well as some interest in unconventional housing.  The question is how much interest is there among Porcupines and does that interest equate to a desire and ability to purchase acreage in a planned off-grid community.

By "Planned" I refer only to the initial subdivision and a very basic access road network.  The sort of people who would be attracted to something like this won't want a lot of structure beyond property lines and access roads.  The absolute bare minimum subdivision I would consider would be ten acres and personally I wouldn't be much interested in anything smaller than forty. Although I have heard of people doing it on as little as two and a half acres, that size lot does not offer much in the way of privacy except in very dense woods and even then, not in winter.

So the question becomes "Is there any interest?" and if so, I would ask the following:

What would the optimum lot size be?
What should the minimum lot size be? (Considering that two or more lots could be combined)
How elaborate whould the access road network be?(This will affect prices of course; a paved road costs more than gravel surfaced dirt, costs more than graded dirt, costs more than two-wheel-tracks-through-the-woods)
What other infrastructure (if any) would you expect the "Developer" to provide?

$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

This is not part of my personal wealth building plan, believe it or not.  I recognize that most of the people who would be interested in this sort of thing are not the folks who buy half million dollar homes and hire decorators to buy the furniture; nor are they ordinarily the type to have large credit lines and lots of cash.

Having said that; I am interested in supporting the back to the land movement (If there is such a thing) to the extent that I am able.  To that end, I would like to do something like this and make enough $$ to cover my costs and pay for the time invested while offering reasonably priced land to people who will respect it for what it is.

What do you think?
How much would it cost?  I'd really be interested in it.  I live in the PRK, and the only good thing about that is that there are a lot of ecowhacko companies that sell solar/fuel cell technology cheap.  PLMK ASAP...
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Greenbacks

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Re: Off-Grid Homestead Subdivision
« Reply #25 on: April 16, 2005, 07:39:31 am »

I had been kicking this idea around for several years. One possibility of community revenue to support common areas is Selling green tags from the comunities generated renewable energy.   http://mainstayenergy.com/modules.php?name=News&file=article&sid=4

A FSP developement company would be an excellent idea. Profit driven for other homes and at or close to cost for FSP'rs. As a custom cabinetmaker I'd love to hear more about the possibilities. I've been trying to work out what kind of renewable mix would be necessary for running a full cabinet shop off the grid. It would be a project that would certainly bring some attention to the FSP also.

Not a member yet, but seriously concidering it. Was getting ready to move to MA from RI but don't want to give up my guns  ;D Found this site and have been perusing the boards..... Liking NH more by the thread.

you should consider setting up a limited equity, land trust eco-village concept...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Land_trust
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dghizzoni

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Re: Off-Grid Homestead Subdivision
« Reply #26 on: April 17, 2005, 10:45:20 pm »

I had been kicking this idea around for several years. One possibility of community revenue to support common areas is Selling green tags from the comunities generated renewable energy.   http://mainstayenergy.com/modules.php?name=News&file=article&sid=4

A FSP developement company would be an excellent idea. Profit driven for other homes and at or close to cost for FSP'rs. As a custom cabinetmaker I'd love to hear more about the possibilities. I've been trying to work out what kind of renewable mix would be necessary for running a full cabinet shop off the grid. It would be a project that would certainly bring some attention to the FSP also.

Not a member yet, but seriously concidering it. Was getting ready to move to MA from RI but don't want to give up my guns  ;D Found this site and have been perusing the boards..... Liking NH more by the thread.

you should consider setting up a limited equity, land trust eco-village concept...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Land_trust

Thanks for the info. Going to be delving into the information to see what I can come up with.
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Josie

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Re: Off-Grid Homestead Subdivision
« Reply #27 on: May 24, 2005, 06:16:56 pm »

I'd like five acres. Really everything fits in that. Little house, ecologically responsible landscaping for "curb appeal," veggies and market goods is the back. Add a micro-woodlot/orchard, some chickens, and a pond, and I'm good to go.

What kind of zoning rules would we have to worry about in that area? I personally would like an Earthship-type design using recycled materials, is that all right? What if I just show up in an Airstream?
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Evenstar

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Re: Off-Grid Homestead Subdivision
« Reply #28 on: May 31, 2005, 03:20:48 pm »

Haven't finished reading all the replies, but I cleared the initial post by my husband and his reply is:

30 to 50 acres (or more), gravel road access, NO HOA, and able to hunt on our property (as that's how we plan to supply most of our food).  Would this be owner financed or would we need to bank finance?  And any ideas on price?  (We're able to negotiate on price, as we're still ironing out our work load versus financial need as we are self-employed -- which makes bank financing harder.)

May post again when I see where the replies go.
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Evenstar

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Re: Off-Grid Homestead Subdivision
« Reply #29 on: May 31, 2005, 04:19:27 pm »

Okay, DEFINITELY prefer off the grid to "Martha Stewart" anything.  We're planning to try solar, wind, water with a propane backup generator (though we've just barely started that research, and plans may change).  A near-cashless lifestyle is VERY appealing, though we couldn't make do without our electronics, so we'd have to do something to generate electricity.  Very interested to see what comes of this!
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