Free State Project Forum

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Pages: [1]   Go Down

Author Topic: New taxes? NO WAY! Says New Hampshire  (Read 3206 times)

jgmaynard

  • FSP Shadow Advertising
  • FSP Participant
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2288
    • The Light of Alexandria
New taxes? NO WAY! Says New Hampshire
« on: June 09, 2003, 03:38:41 pm »

New taxes? NO WAY! Says New Hampshire

Hi all:

Just came across this poll, thought you'd enjoy it... New taxes only have an 11% support in New Hampshire... Shouldn't be toooo hard to get around... ;)

http://americanresearchgroup.com/nhpoll/nhp43.html

"My Kitchen Table Budget is the first step towards controlled spending, greater efficiency, and, of course, lower taxes. The voters came out in record numbers and their message was loud and clear: No income tax. No sales tax. No higher taxes. No way. I couldn't agree more. "
- NH Governor Craig Benson

JM
Logged
The Light of Alexandria By James Maynard

A history of the first 1,000 years of science, and how it changed the ancient world, and our world today.



http://www.lightofalexandria.com

robmayn

  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 61
  • Freedom Rising!
    • Citizens For Property Rights
Re:New taxes? NO WAY! Says New Hampshire
« Reply #1 on: June 09, 2003, 05:14:00 pm »

Once again, New Hampshire is making Vermont's struggling liberty lovers jealous.
Logged

jgmaynard

  • FSP Shadow Advertising
  • FSP Participant
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2288
    • The Light of Alexandria
Re:New taxes? NO WAY! Says New Hampshire
« Reply #2 on: June 09, 2003, 11:09:48 pm »

Well, invite all your friends to join us at the Escape!

June 21-29 - Come for all of it, or just a little....But make your reservations soon... Don't forget to register for the first BBQ...

http://www.lpnh.org/escape.htm

JM
Logged
The Light of Alexandria By James Maynard

A history of the first 1,000 years of science, and how it changed the ancient world, and our world today.



http://www.lightofalexandria.com

StevenN

  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 191
  • Friend of the FSP
Re:New taxes? NO WAY! Says New Hampshire
« Reply #3 on: June 10, 2003, 12:41:40 am »

Some thoughts:

-While Democrats were the highest % in favor tax increases (30%. For Dems in my state, I'd think it would be 75-90%!), they also made up the highest percentage in favor of cutting expenditures (54%)! I think that's great news, but maybe James could shed some light on this apparent discrepancy.

-No Republicans seemed to be in favor of increasing taxes. I think this is pretty consistent with the libertarian-like anti-tax sentiment of NH republicans that has been expressed on this forum.

-Seeing as how they make up maybe 1/3 of the voting population in NH, I've wondered about the independent's general political leanings: libertarian, Green, socialist, etc. Looks like they at least seem to be very anti-tax to me.

This poll highlights why I think the size-of-population factor is way overblown. I think, for any given issue, we should be able to get a majority for economic and social freedoms. Let's say the party split is 1/3-1/3-1/3. Especially if many of the independent's are Greens, we should easily be able to get social freedoms passed. If all the D's and I's voted for social freedoms, that's 66% right there! And I think it would be hard to argue that NH's residents are viciously against economic freedoms.

NH's critics (and critics of every state) point to specific laws or politicians. First, I don't necessarily believe in micro-analyzing specific laws or politicians, even when it may be beneficial to that state. Statism is alive and well everywhere! But I'd be more concerned with more subjective factors: what are the general sympathies of the populace and how receptive are they generally to the FSP? I'm not so worried about a certain law passed in a state, I'm focused on, given the FSP activism, will people in state X change their minds? I believe that, in NH, people would have voted differently if they understood the real issues at hand. In this type of environment, the FSP will flourish, IMO.

Not to mention, NH is already an essentially libertarian state. Eliminate education (doable) and a few social freedoms and we're basically there! One benefit of NH is that is has the "least" amount of work that needs to be done.

But in fairness, I also think WY has a libertarian-leaning populace. Both WY and NH are excellent choices.(and the only winnable states, IMO)
« Last Edit: June 10, 2003, 12:45:26 am by StevenN »
Logged
"A noble spirit embiggens the smallest man" -- Jebediah Springfield

Robert H.

  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1361
  • Jeffersonian
    • Devolution USA
Re:New taxes? NO WAY! Says New Hampshire
« Reply #4 on: June 10, 2003, 03:56:05 am »

-No Republicans seemed to be in favor of increasing taxes. I think this is pretty consistent with the libertarian-like anti-tax sentiment of NH republicans that has been expressed on this forum.

NH Senate Republicans seem to be a different breed though, in some instances at least, from the governor and GOP'ers in the House.  I note that they added back more social spending to the budget than either the governor or the House wanted (even though this did not involve a tax increase).  This was mostly made possible by the promise of $84 million in federal money to close the New Hampshire budget gap.

Here's one article on this schism: Budget debate strains old ties

"There's a lot at stake in this year's budget debate. In particular, the fate of several Health and Human Services programs hang in the balance. Benson's budget proposal cut Medicaid provider reimbursement rates by 5 percent. The Senate restored all the cuts to Medicaid providers and increased rates in some areas. Benson's plan sunk programs that people with severe physical disabilities depend on, and consequently the disability wait list, which is already stacked with people desperate for help, would continue to grow. The Senate proposal offers more than $10 million to address the wait list next year."

And another:

Benson noncommittal on plan before Senate

"Senate Finance Committee Chairman Dick Green replied that it was a good thing the federal money had come in, or else the battle would have been over which taxes the state should increase. "We could not pass (the budget) the way (Benson) wanted to pass it," said Green, a Republican from Rochester. "Too many people got hurt, and I wasn't willing to do that."


Quote
-Seeing as how they make up maybe 1/3 of the voting population in NH, I've wondered about the independent's general political leanings: libertarian, Green, socialist, etc. Looks like they at least seem to be very anti-tax to me.

The Greens mustered 22,000 votes in NH in 2000, and were easily the largest third party presence there, although they are stronger in Maine and Massachusetts.   I've read some indication lately though that NH Greens may be on their way back to the Democratic Party because they're losing confidence in Nader and believe they've got more of a chance to advance their agenda via the Democrats.  I saw an article on this the other day in an NH paper, but didn't save the URL.

Quote
This poll highlights why I think the size-of-population factor is way overblown. I think, for any given issue, we should be able to get a majority for economic and social freedoms.

How would you do that though when you consider that very few candidates apart from LP'ers support both economic and social freedoms?  Vote in a Republican, and you're likely to get fiscal freedom and social conservatism.  Vote in a Democrat, and you're likely to get fiscal statism and social liberalism.

Quote
And I think it would be hard to argue that NH's residents are viciously against economic freedoms.

Overall, no, they're not.  They obviously don't like taxes.  I'm seeing more criticisms of Benson starting to crop up in their papers though, letters to the editor included (as opposed to just staff op-ed pieces; I expect those to be liberal).  And the above articles obviously demonstrate a schism in the GOP as to what might be considered "going too far."

It's too bad that we won't have another election cycle before the state vote.  I'd really like to see how the people of New Hampshire rate Benson's administration at the polls.  The small government emphasis may be hitting a plateau in New Hampshire, and it would be interesting to know whether the general public will back Benson's priorities or those of the Senate Republicans.

Quote
Not to mention, NH is already an essentially libertarian state. Eliminate education (doable) and a few social freedoms and we're basically there! One benefit of NH is that is has the "least" amount of work that needs to be done.

I'd be careful about assuming that.  Most of the protest that I see cropping up in the letters-to-the-editor that I referred to are coming from the direction of education funding and social services for the eldery and disabled.  And while I see a committment to lower taxes in what I read from New Hampshire residents, I don't see much wavering in their committment to sustaining public education or continuing social services.

They just seem to be in a quandary about how to fund them without raising taxes too much.  Now, that's a far cry from the populations of New York and California where they'd probably respond by smearing on the blue face paint, taking up their banners, and hitting the battlefield crying "Soak the rich!!!"   ;)  It's definitely a trend in our favor.  But...along the lines of the same question I asked before, is there a large enough base of support in New Hampshire to back efforts to continue to scale things down, as opposed to merely saying "no more new taxes, but I still want the government to educate my kid, and I still want Grandma Moses to get her electric bill subsidy"?
« Last Edit: June 10, 2003, 06:46:07 am by RobertH »
Logged

George Reich

  • FSP Participant
  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 546
  • I just *love* it when Hank and Dagny brainstorm!
Re:New taxes? NO WAY! Says New Hampshire
« Reply #5 on: June 10, 2003, 08:33:23 am »

"Senate Finance Committee Chairman Dick Green replied that it was a good thing the federal money had come in, or else the battle would have been over which taxes the state should increase. "We could not pass (the budget) the way (Benson) wanted to pass it," said Green, a Republican from Rochester. "Too many people got hurt, and I wasn't willing to do that."

Dick Green represents Stafford County, the only one in the state where registered Democrats outnumber registered Republicans. His upset election victory in 2002 over Caroline McCarley was a huge surprise to everyone in this largely Democratic area.

A good friend and co-worker of mine is Dick Green's neighbor. Knowing Dick, his guess is that Dick finds it necessary to pander to the Democrats to some degree or else his seat will almost certainly go back to a Democrat in 2004.

I'm not saying I approve of this in any way; I'm just offering it as an explanation of what might be going on here.

 :-\
« Last Edit: June 10, 2003, 08:33:59 am by libertarian40 »
Logged
If everyone were rich there would be no need for government assistance. If everyone were rich all children could attend private schools. If everyone were rich, government would become superfluous. Read the free e-book at this site:

http://www.scienceofgettingrich.net
Pages: [1]   Go Up
 

anything