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Author Topic: Did you like public school?  (Read 13339 times)

Josie

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Re: Did you like public school?
« Reply #15 on: May 20, 2005, 10:13:35 pm »

I didn't go to public school. I was homeschooled and it kind of sucked, but I did get a really good English/History/Geography education, even if my Math/Science was pretty absymal.

My best friends were in and out of public school. One had his arm broken twice. Another got a concussion and a broken leg. My best girlfriend had her brother to protect her but that's no way to go through highschool. Some of my current classmates in college identify which school they went to by which gruesome death happened there.

"I went to blah-blah-blah."

"The one with the shooting?"

"No, that's blah-blah. I went to the one where a girl slashed another girl's throat in the lunchroom. That was my senior year."

So while I don't love homeschooling completely, I can't say I got ripped off that badly.
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BrianMcCandliss

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Re: Did you like public school?
« Reply #16 on: June 26, 2005, 01:10:40 pm »

The entire purpose of compulsory-attendance laws is NOT to educate children for their own benefit, but to indoctrinate them for the supposed benefit of society. However in reality, it's for the benefit of negligent parents and government which wants willing subjects.

As a result, public schools dont expel problem-kids, simply because a) it's their job to keep them off the streets at any cost, and  b) their victims often have nowhere to run due to compulsory-attendance laws; truant-officers don't give a damn if the kid is fleeing for his life-- the officer's department is truancy, not homocide.
 Also, school-faculty are pressured to maximize enrollment, and so students' rights-- which are already sacrificed to attendance, which is a deprivation of liberty-- take a back-seat to bureacracy; they trivialize violations, and do everything to avoid simply expelling the miscreants. It's also easier to look the other way and "blame the victim" when you've got a captive audience; most of the time, victims are simply blamed, by being accused of "not getting along" or "not making friends" etc. when they are clearly the victims of deliberate criminal predation. Bureaucracy follows the course of least resistance, and it's far easier to blame the victim than to take responsibility for dealing with the problem.

Private schools are often equally bad or worse, since they have the victims over a barrel-- i.e. their attendance is more of a privilege than a right, and the alternative is either going back to public school, or juvenile detention; likewise, they tend to be elite prep-schools, and so they have a similarly elite mentality that blames the victim even more, by rationalizing misbehavior with psychobabble, or even a sign of intelligence-- and victimhood as a sign of inferiority; they do anything to make the school look good-- which includes tolerating abuse, since that way they can simply accuse the victim of being less intelligent-- it's standard elitist procedure, just like Hitler claiming that Aryans were of superior intellect, and blaming the sufferering of HIS victims on their "inferior intelligence."  Conversely, the most aggressive students are excused as "misunderstood in expressing their superior intellect--" particularly if they have high test-scores and grade-point averages, thereby making them essentially "above the law;" a person's worth at such schools is measured by empirical measures of intelligence, rather than their conduct as a human being.

This isn't unusual, since bullies tend to have high self-esteem and are more ruthless and aggressive, which tends to raise such scores-- while the reverse is often true for their victims, i.e. they are made to feel guilty for being less ruthless and more conscientious, and so have lower self-esteem and test scores as a result; this creates a vicious-cycle since the victim is made to feel even more inferior to the abuser and so suffers in performance, while the abuser in turn likewise is made to feel superior to the victim, and so becomes more ruthless and arrogant. Simply put, we're dealing with a breeding-ground for sociopathy.

Likewise, such bullies can be expulsion-cases from normal school due to their behavior-problems, which puts them in the same boat as those who flee from such-- only to find themselves subjected to greater abuse, and blame for such.
This "survival of the fittest" philosophy therefore finds its pinnacle at private schools-- even parochial schools; as such, private schools are no escape.

Also the bullies at private schools tend more toward psychological abuse than physical, since it's safer and easier to get away with-- and often more effective in destroying a victim's self-esteem and dignity, particularly when it's condoned by the school via blaming the victim (or simple indifference).
(Not to say that physical abuse isn't involved-- often it's worse in that they're more ruthless).

As long as students are forced to attend school without absolute rights, they are technically slaves-- and can expect no better treatment.  However in reality they are WORSE-off than slaves, since the school has plausible deniability in claiming that they are NOT slaves, and therefore taking no responsibility for their well-being or safety-- and in fact subjecting human beings to sheer animalism.

I won't hide the fact that I'm relating this subjugation of rights, to statism; of all states that have compulsory-attendance laws, only Massachussets had them prior to the Civil War. Thereafter, all states began adopting them, thanks to the new statism that followed the suppression of state sovereignty; and the Supreme Court likewise upheld such as Constitutional-- the same Supreme Court that likewise upheld mandatory sterilization and internment.

I truly don't understand how the law can claim that compulsory-attendance laws are NOT involuntary servitude; however under statism, the government has a carte blanche to do as it pleases-- and cook up a big-word rationalization to add insult to injury.
« Last Edit: June 30, 2005, 11:15:10 am by BrianMcCandliss »
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bailey228

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Re: Did you like public school?
« Reply #17 on: June 30, 2005, 10:28:05 pm »

At my school we have the best no fighting policy!   ;)


If someone comes at you with fists of fury, you are PROHIBITED from fighting back.
If you do, you get hauled away with your attacker by the police!

HAHA!! you think that's bad at my high school, even if someone came at you for no reason and you just stood there and was a punching bag for the person, BOTH of you would be suspended for 3 weeks! Funny thing was that you're not allowed to miss more than 5 days of school or you'd fail (due to the fact that they get money every day you're there) So even though you were suspended, you automatically failed!! Plus you're not allowed to make up any of the work you missed (not that it matters anyways because you had no chance of passing the quarter) so even if you WANTED to learn, you couldn't. Their whole policy was Zero tolerance on everything. Zero tolerance just makes it easy for them not to have to think about wether it is wrong or right, just screw everyone over!
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BrianMcCandliss

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Re: Did you like public school?
« Reply #18 on: July 01, 2005, 12:57:23 am »

I think it's a good idea not to have kids take the law into their own hands, but just get away and report the incident instead, rather than escalate things into a brawl-- just like the law requires;  however this is only when due process of law is likewise applied, i.e. assault and/or battery charges filed against the perpetrator. I don't stand with the "karate kid" stuff, of tolerating abuse, so that kids need to learn hand-to-hand combat in order to survive; if they do, then clearly schools are a war-zone, and there's no surprise that kids are bringing weapons to defend themselves.

But the fact is, that schools simply want to subordinate the rights of the victim, as being secondary to the objectives of the school-- which is to keep criminals in the school, and off the streets-- while the victim just has to accept the oxymoron of "school justice."

 That way, the "social engineers" who create and maintain the schools as a part of their utopian hypocrisy of "education vs. rehabilitation" can pretend that kids are a product of society, and use school to subject your kids to their sociological experiment-- kinda like the Nazi's used people as experiments. Only this time, the school is the judge, jury and executioner in terms of the children's rights, doing as they please with almost no recourse on the part of the victim.

It's really very similar to Nazi socialism-- kids are forced into public schools by law, and then subjected to government treatments and experiments for the supposed benefit of the whole-- while the rights of the individual are virtually meaningless, since criminals are enabled while victims are disempowered. The purpose is to break down the person's sense of individuality and rights, and inspire conformity and expendibility to the collective; this is the objective of any socialist indoctrination. Likewise, rights of the individual are placed secondary to the good of the collective, as proven by the denial of due legal process; assault, battery and other crimes are not even considered as such, but merely "problem behavior" etc. at worst, and handled with similarly experimental solutions-- which only destroys the victim's rights, and encourages the criminals even more.

Thus, as long as public schools are able to obtain a captive audience, and without full resposibility to the rights of such, it's no secret that crimes against humanity will be trivialized and denied, turning a blind eye to the abuse-- as in any program of socialist indoctrination, whereby the mind of the individual is subjugated via totalitarian suppression of the truth: i.e. brainwashing.
It's really very sick, but it's so commonplace that people have simply come to accept it-- just like gun-laws that result in only criminals and select permit-holders to bear arms; so if you are neither, you just have to pretend that the law can stop an attack.
« Last Edit: July 06, 2005, 06:20:02 pm by BrianMcCandliss »
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Menolly

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Re: Did you like public school?
« Reply #19 on: July 07, 2005, 11:52:12 pm »

After being in private school until my junior year of high school, I attempted to finish senior year at a public school in Connecticut. I lasted 2 weeks there before deciding to just get my GED and go straight to college. I felt like I'd been thrown into a prison. Why did I need a reason to be in a hallway? Why couldn't I go outside and eat lunch on the grass? Why, if I didn't have class during a period in the middle of the day, couldn't I leave and come back for the next one? And why, even if I couldn't leave, did I have to spend it in a cafeteria packed with hundreds of other students like sardines? Would you rather study in there or out on the grass on a nice spring day? How do young adults learn to be responsible and independent in an environment structured very much like what I'd imagine jail to be like (other than having to sleep there). No wonder lots of kids think of school as a place to be avoided as much as possible. I'm sure that what I experienced in my short time there was only a small sample of the whole picture as well. I have heard of schools where your backpack has to be see-through and students go through metal detectors. Still sounds like jail to me. I prefer to enjoy my learning.
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BrianMcCandliss

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Re: Did you like public school?
« Reply #20 on: July 08, 2005, 07:27:32 am »

After being in private school until my junior year of high school, I attempted to finish senior year at a public school in Connecticut. I lasted 2 weeks there before deciding to just get my GED and go straight to college. I felt like I'd been thrown into a prison. Why did I need a reason to be in a hallway? Why couldn't I go outside and eat lunch on the grass? Why, if I didn't have class during a period in the middle of the day, couldn't I leave and come back for the next one? And why, even if I couldn't leave, did I have to spend it in a cafeteria packed with hundreds of other students like sardines? Would you rather study in there or out on the grass on a nice spring day? How do young adults learn to be responsible and independent in an environment structured very much like what I'd imagine jail to be like (other than having to sleep there). No wonder lots of kids think of school as a place to be avoided as much as possible. I'm sure that what I experienced in my short time there was only a small sample of the whole picture as well. I have heard of schools where your backpack has to be see-through and students go through metal detectors. Still sounds like jail to me. I prefer to enjoy my learning.

I'm curious as to where you got the idea that schools were built for the benefit of the students, or to teach them to be "responsible and independent?"
That was never the intent-- why do you think attendance is compulsory under penalty of law (i.e. Big Brother will make it worse if you don't go)?
Rather, they were built on the totalitarian principle that "an educated populace is 'necessary' to societal advancement" etc.
That sounds like Stalinism, and the purpose is naturally to break people down and make them obediant, and lose all sense of individual rights and liberty. In fact, John Adams himself stated that "'necessity' is ever the plea of the tyrant."

What you "prefer" is irrelevant to them-- the student is a third-class citizen, usually with no choice; and like I said in another thread, even leaving to go to a private school often is no help, since the student is often labeled as the problem, and carries the stigma of such.

And where the law doesn't get you, the SYSTEM does-- the "better" colleges usually won't admit you on the basis of just a GED, and scholarships are out of the question; students are judged like show-animals on the basis of their compliance in embracing the system, rather than their independence from it.

It's simply an evil system that gives anyone such power, let alone to an un-elected or mandatory body-- and with no accountability to the people.
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caroline

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Re: Did you like public school?
« Reply #21 on: October 30, 2005, 01:13:52 pm »

I hated it with a passion. Especially since I re-entered public school after 3 consecutive years of alternative education: private school (1 yr) and home-schooling (2 yrs). It was shocking to return to the mainstream system after having had so much freedom. I didn't return because home-schooling wasn't successful, but rather because I thought I wanted to be an "ordinary teen". I had started a non-fiction memoir analyzing all of public schools' faults and what would be good solutions, but the project tapered off after I graduated.


Gatto's article on public schools is fascinating; one of the best articles I've ever read. So apparently, it's actually a GOOD sign when kids hate school.
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Absence

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Re: Did you like public school?
« Reply #22 on: October 30, 2005, 02:24:27 pm »

Public school s just fine! You just should be high all the time! ;D :P
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jgmaynard

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Re: Did you like public school?
« Reply #23 on: October 30, 2005, 02:52:42 pm »

I detested public school - Sociallization?!?!?!? That, for me, consisted of getting beaten up by kids bigger than me. Meanwhile, I knew more about most subjects than my teachers. A complete waste of 12 years.

JM
« Last Edit: October 30, 2005, 04:11:15 pm by jgmaynard »
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brontus

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Re: Did you like public school?
« Reply #24 on: October 30, 2005, 03:32:17 pm »

In a lot of ways, I think school, like so many other things in life, is what you make of it.  I went through Public Education all of my life and didn't have any real problems until college (not because I was ill equipped but because, at least for me, Calculus and an Indian accent don't mesh well). 

In high school I was very popular across the board of social groups and with most teachers.  The Jocks, the Preppies, the Band, the Student Government, the Aggies, the Goths, the druggies, the slackers, the nerds; if I wasn't liked, I was at least respected.  I ran for Senior Class Vice President and won 70% of the vote against the incumbent (Jr class VP) and her main opponent.
I routinely broke school regulations, including the weapons policy.  I wore a 5' chain around my waist the entire senior year and despite being told on several occasions that it was a violation of school weapons policy. 
I routinely walked out of physics class to get a snack when the lunchroom opened; sometimes the teacher would give me money to get something for him, but there were no hall passes because students were only allowed in the lunchroom during their lunch period.
I drove my car out to the football field to listen to music during the archery section of phys. ed.  The gym teacher made me return my car to the parking lot, but I was in violation of half a dozen rules. 
And yet the only trouble I got into the entire year, the only detention was actually from a misunderstanding with one of the few teachers that didn't like me.

At the same time I don't want to give the impression that it was me fighting against the evil empire.  The school was quite understanding on a number of things.  We were one of those Channel One schools where they give the school free TV's in exchange for showing the program every day.  The TV's came on automatically every morning for the morning announcements and then Channel One and the teachers were encouraged to simply turn off the TV after the announcements.
Reciting the pledge of allegiance was completely voluntary, you just had to stand; and many teachers didn't enforce that.
I had several teachers that only gave lip service to state/federally mandated curricula.  In Physics II we voted on which topics to study.  In European History we read excerpts from such works as the Bible, An Essay Concerning Human Understanding, the Livathan, Luther's 95 Theses, The Prince, and Nietzsche's Thus Spoke Zarathustra.  One English teacher used a classroom currency to be used to buy out of assignments, and I quickly became quite rich selling such services and proof-reading and editing as well as issuing loans.

All this from a small rural district whose budget was routinely voted down each year.

But as I said, school is what you make of it.  I have spoken to the heads of of my class's Goths and slackers, and they have both considered high school to be the worst years of their lives
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BrianMcCandliss

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Re: Did you like public school?
« Reply #25 on: October 31, 2005, 09:38:48 pm »

In a lot of ways, I think school, like so many other things in life, is what you make of it.

That's pretty ironic, considering you just made it out to be a popularity-contest-- one which you happened to have been dealt a lucky hand. It could have very well gone otherwise, and you'd have found yourself in a hell-pit from which there was no escape; you were simply LUCKY-- and as a result, are very naive-- typical of ANY "liberal who's never been mugged."

And so it's hypocritical to think that just because it was a positive experience for you, that it's ok to blame the victims of a chaotic public-school environment-- as well as highly insulting to them, claiming that THEY ALONE were to blame for their negative experiences.

Your type has no concept of liberty, and takes your unusual fortune for granted. Kind of sociopathic, in a way, i.e. thinking that the world revolves around you, and that since things went your way then you must exist FOR you.

Abraham Maslow stated "there is no such thing as a well-adjusted slave," and I happen to agree. I'm actually reminded by your statements of "Roots," where "Fiddler" talked about how he was a "good slave" and so he "gots dem pine boards in my floor, and in the winter it don't take much coughin' before I gets me a cup o' fine whiskey for my med'cine!"

Life is "what you make it," ONLY when there's freedom; otherwise, life is what OTHERS make YOU.
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"The practical man adapts himself to the environment.  The impractical man tries to adapt the environment to himself.  All progress in the world has been made by impractical men.” --   George Bernard Shaw

« Last Edit: November 01, 2005, 03:54:15 pm by BrianMcCandliss »
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