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Author Topic: Homeschooling options  (Read 14384 times)

Ron

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Re:Homeschooling options
« Reply #15 on: February 17, 2003, 11:45:06 am »

Resources
Coeur d'Alene Charter Academy
37% of the enrollment of this northern Idaho charter were formerly homeschooled.
http://www.cdacharter.org/

Great Places in Idaho
Homeschool mom, Angela, provides this useful links for homeschoolers looking for fun field trips for kids in the Treasure Valley area.
http://hometown.aol.com/ILuvIrises/IDfun.html

North Idaho Communities Online
NICON is a free, community-based regional communications network, offering a range of information services throughout the North Idaho region.
http://www.nicon.org/


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Ron

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Re:Homeschooling options
« Reply #16 on: February 17, 2003, 11:54:54 am »

Support Groups
Family Unschooling Network
1809 North 7th St, Boise, ID 83702, 208-345-2703; Contact: ndjensen@qwest.net.

Heartland Home Educators
The Weiser River Homeschooling Support Group is an inclusive non-profit support group to provide support for families in the Central Idaho area who are homeschooling, without regard to religious and political beliefs.
http://www.geocities.com/heartlandhomeeducators/

Magic Valley Home Educators
Welcome To MVHE Online! We have compiled some helpful information for you about homeschooling and about our area, south-central Idaho, Twin Falls area.
http://www.geocities.com/mvhenet/

Palouse Home Learning Alternatives
Disbanded. However, for those interested in forming a new inclusive group in the Moscow area, please contact Ann Bowes at bowes@moscow.com.

Pend Oreille Unschoolers
Email link. A natural learning, non-coercive, no curriculum group meets for playdays.
knowles@povn.com <knowles@povn.com>

Snake River Home Educators' Association
Serving home educators in the Idaho Falls, Idaho Area.
http://home.rmci.net/portela/SRHEA.html

Southeast Idaho Homeschool Association
If you are homeschooling your children in the Pocatello  area, we consider you a member! We are a diverse group of parents in Southeast Idaho  of varying beliefs and circumstances who are brought together by our interest in homeschool excellence.
http://www.eyedocgreg.com/homeschool/

Southern Idaho's Great Homeschool Tracker
S I G H T is a network of homeschoolers in Southern and Central Idaho which tracks down articles of interest, curriculum catalog information, and monthly field trips and then relays them along in our monthly newsletter. Contact tracker4u@earthlink.net.
Contact tracker4u@earthlink.net.


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Zxcv

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Re:Homeschooling options
« Reply #17 on: February 27, 2003, 01:16:41 am »

Before you homeschool, it's a good idea to understand the learning process. My favorite reference on that is "How Children Learn" by John Holt. Really an eye-opener...
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jeanius

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Re:Homeschooling options
« Reply #18 on: March 02, 2003, 03:36:08 pm »

Ditto "How Children Fail" also by John Holt.  I also find Gatto inspiring.  
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rambler42

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"structure dropouts"
« Reply #19 on: August 13, 2003, 09:14:31 am »

I think that using a planned, set curriculum is very helpful in starting your homeschool, but my family and I have found ourselves to be "structure dropouts" -- that is, we tried having a structured homeschool, didn't work for us. I resigned my post as co chairman of our local homeschool group to join a local unschooling support group because it fits our needs better than the old group did. So, choosing a curriculum is good, but don't rule out the possibility of operating without a set curriculum.

As for the FSP candidate states, if homeschooling is an important issue, all of the eastern seaboard states, as well as Nordt and South Dakota (ESPECIALLY North Dakota) do not have laws that are friendly to homeschooling freedoms. Researching the homeschool laws (this is the first criteria for us in selecting any move), we have ranked the states, in order, with Idaho first, followed by Alaska, Wyoming and Montana (Montana's immunization law is a weakness, although, as an ordained minister, I am fairly sure I can establish the religious exemption easily). If North or South Dakota is chosen, we will move there ONLY because we didn't choose them as "opt out" states (North Dakota would be the worst, although, it does have a loophole if you can prove that you can pass the national teacher's exam (I am fairly certain I will be able to swing this, and will attempt to do so if North Dakota is chosen).

We will also be moving to Idaho if an eastern seaboard state is chosen (I am thinking that there may be a number of like minded individuals), and will still be united with the FSP in purpose, if not in fact. I will be hoping that, if this situation arises, we will find support among the FSP in our move.
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sotetf

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Thanks, Jeanius!
« Reply #20 on: August 14, 2003, 01:53:28 pm »

I appreciate that link, very intesting approach to homeschooling, as in the classical approach, or so called trivium.

This is quite interesting.

Thanks to others as well for their imput.
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schletty

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Re:Homeschooling options
« Reply #21 on: August 15, 2003, 10:17:59 pm »

I've been homeschooling for a year and a half after a bad experience at a private non-denominational school.  At first, I adopted some of the books the school had used (for continuity).  I bought books on homeschooling and read them.  **Then** I found "The Well Trained Mind, A Guide to Classical Education at Home" by Jessie Wise and Susan Wise-Bauer.  This mother and daughter team (daughter was homeschooled and is homeschooling her own) teach the reader about the trivium method.  It is rigorous, has high standards and yet made homeschooling easy for me.  It outlines curriculum, while offering choices, gives you schedules which you can use and/or alter as you choose, I can't say enough about this book.  It is definitely structured homeschooling so isn't for those following an unschooling approach.  The trivium can involve bible teaching but the book (WTM) offers both secular and Christian alternatives - we use a secular approach.  They promote Saxon math but offer alternatives depending on your teaching style and students.  It is probably not a coincidence that I found out about this book on an objectivist educational newsgroup which I believe no longer exists.  This book is well worth investigating.  In the short run you can check www.welltrainedmind.com for more information.  Susan Wise-Bauer has written a couple of books since the publication of WTM which can be used as well - one on ancient history for an elementary audience, 1st and 2nd grade language lessons (grammar) and a second history on medevil times is due out momentarily.

FYI

I can't speak loudly enough in support of this approach. My wife and I love that it takes advantage of the natural predispositions of each development stage of the child.  BTW, the medieval book is out and lives up to our expectations.
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jeanius

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Re:Homeschooling options
« Reply #22 on: August 16, 2003, 10:52:23 pm »

I've had SOTW II for a couple of months and just received the activity guide yesterday.  It does hold up to the original.  I'm also please with Living Learning Books Chemistry.  The authors created their science curriculum based on the WTM model.  I'm obviously a big fan of the WTM.  I've addicted several of my homeschooling friends and neighbors!

Jean
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