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Author Topic: The Galt Gulch RV Park  (Read 7282 times)

glen

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The Galt Gulch RV Park
« on: September 15, 2002, 09:48:51 pm »

In the future free state it is possible to set up a commercial RV park with public spaces out front and private spaces out back. The public spaces charge the seasonal ‘going rate’ and the private spaces pay ‘long term’ rates.

With this arrangement, communities of like-minded people can live together in the long term private area. Rules are normally kept to a minimum even in non ideological RV parks and when neighbors develop irresolvable conflicts, they can move to another part of the RV park or just leave.

A special benefit to free staters is that this will help with the move to the free state: The new-comers can live inexpensively until an acceptable job and housing are found. Also, people who have made the transition to house and job can sell the RV to someone who needs a way to make the move.


Concerning the RV lifestyle, here is a little something I call ‘Everything I own has got wheels underneath it’

You will never be able to clearly measure how much of your current economic life is controlled by other people until you commit to the full time RV lifestyle.

The most obvious difference is the cost of your home: A good used motorhome or travel trailer can be bought for under $20,000 and paid off in a few years as a simple car loan. A conventional stationary home will cost you far, far more and require decades to pay off.

The next most obvious difference is the taxes and other assorted fees: An RV can be licensed and insured in the cheapest possible state (Nevada is very popular). A conventional stationary home, on the other hand, is a easy target for every tax proposal, insurance scheme, and community improvement scam imaginable.

The third most obvious difference is the utilities: In an RV you own your own utilities. You can make any alterations or improvements you like, within the limits of common sense highway safety regulations, and can shop around for the best buys (non-fluoridated water, cheap propane, next-generation storage batteries, etc). In a conventional stationary home, you are told what utility services you can have, how much they will cost, and you will need to get permits to alter or improve anything – or face stiff penalties.

The single most expensive cost related to operating a RV is the cost of fuel and repairs required to drive it. Here though, a wide variety a strategies have evolved to suit every budget and purpose.

Some people never go anywhere. They buy a piece of land and park the rig, or pay a small rent to hook up to a friends house, or get a long term caretakers job which allows them to hook up for free.

Other people bounce from place to place as money or jobs allow. Others make a habit of moving from one free campground to another (up to 14 day limit, per). Others, like myself, park the rig somewhere as a base camp and use a smaller camper to do all the exploring and sightseeing.

And finally, because of space and weight considerations, everything you own or want to own must be thought about and justified: the barbell set and the aerobic jungle gym thing? The two car garage full of stuff you might need someday? A 100 different clothing outfits with matching shoes? Probably not.

Once you get through this process and work out your personal system, you will find a level of economic freedom you never thought possible. Also this will be a freedom that you create and control every day – not a political freedom that requires agreement with other people or a cultural freedom that constantly requires you to tell other people to mind their own business.
« Last Edit: October 13, 2003, 09:20:57 pm by glen »
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Patriot69

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Re:The Galt Gulch RV Park
« Reply #1 on: September 18, 2002, 12:49:24 pm »

In the meantime, you can find a bit of this here on the left coast. I run a campground/ RV park here in Carmel, Calif., and I do so in a manner that conveys our Libertarian ideals. I say this, not as a shameless plug for the place, but to let you know you can find some of the Galt's Gulch ideals that we all strive for. If your passing through, or want to stay awhile, give us a call. Or better yet, log on to www.saddlemountaincamping.com Let me know that your an FSP member and I'll save you as much $ as I possibly can ( You ARE saving up money for the move, right?). Randall 831.624.1617
By the way, there is currently no additional tax on your fees here, "they" seem to have overlooked this....
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"The future doesn't belong to the faint-hearted.  It belongs to the brave." -- Ronald Reagan

WHR4

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"Absentee Citizens" in the Free State?
« Reply #2 on: April 18, 2003, 08:19:04 am »

Some people who live here in New York City claim residency in nearby states, especially if they have a vacation home there.  While those who work here still pay taxes here, they gain the benefit of the other state's rates on health insurance, auto insurance, etc. and also are eligible to apply for carry permits and such in the other state.

Does anyone know if it would be legal and feasible to own a vacation home, or a share in a vacation home, in the Free State and claim the Free State as your home?  This might be an option for those of us who would like to support the Free State, and have someplace to get away to when we want, without the burden of moving there permanently.  Kind of like having a share in a vacation house in the Poconos and claiming Pennsylvania residency, while living and working mostly in New York.

Just a thought.  Anyone have any info on this scheme's legality?
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JasonPSorens

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Re:"Absentee Citizens" in the Free State?
« Reply #3 on: April 18, 2003, 08:36:03 am »

It's legal and doable in just about any state, so long as you own property & pay some bills there.  As the FAQ notes, people who choose to do this might want to sign up as Friends but not Members. :)
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"Educate your children, educate yourselves, in the love for the freedom of others, for only in this way will your own freedom not be a gratuitous gift from fate. You will be aware of its worth and will have the courage to defend it." --Joaquim Nabuco (1883), Abolitionism

Karl

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Re:"Absentee Citizens" in the Free State?
« Reply #4 on: April 18, 2003, 08:57:35 am »

Does anyone know if it would be legal and feasible to own a vacation home, or a share in a vacation home, in the Free State and claim the Free State as your home?  This might be an option for those of us who would like to support the Free State, and have someplace to get away to when we want, without the burden of moving there permanently.  Kind of like having a share in a vacation house in the Poconos and claiming Pennsylvania residency, while living and working mostly in New York.

I researched a bit about Wyoming once, and found it has very liberal residency requirements for voter registration, you need only live there for a short time, and so long as you maintain your permanent address there, you're considered a resident of that state.  Wyoming also has cheap real estate and low property taxes.  Dick Cheney did this so he could run for VP, even though he really lived and worked in Texas.  But each state has its own residency requirements, and then it may vary for the purposes of voter registration, taxation, and different welfare programs.
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rodschmidt

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Re:"Absentee Citizens" in the Free State?
« Reply #5 on: October 10, 2003, 04:10:03 am »


George Bush Sr. was a "resident" of Texas because he rented a hotel room there two weeks out of the year.
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