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Author Topic: Industrial Hemp  (Read 28056 times)

Uday Stalin

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Re:Industrial Hemp
« Reply #45 on: October 01, 2003, 09:33:23 pm »

Once we remove those annoying regulations preventing us from growing whatever we like, I think that THC-filled hemp farms will be much more profitable.  

The only problem is that with a true free market, so many people will be growing hemp hoping to "cash in" that the price will plummet, and eventually, there'll be no price differential between hemp with or without THC.

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thewaka

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Re:Industrial Hemp
« Reply #46 on: October 02, 2003, 02:03:15 pm »

Conversion from gas, oil or coal-fired electric plants to GT-MHR nuclear would be a boon to the environment, eliminating many tons of greenhouse gas emissions and smog, without evicting a single indigenous species.

RS, there would be no need to truck new equipment in and old out? No need to build new facilities? What kinds of emissions are there while creating the new equipment and doing the conversion? It can't be zero. And some species are going to be evicted/disrupted for our continued existence, no matter how few of us there are. Unless you are planning to pass laws moving towards zero population growth (and enforce them), there will be no way humans will not continue to disrupt the environment in some way and to a greater degree most likely. All creatures do, even the ones you want to save.

All of this talk of hemp production is great, I am all for it. However, the feds still regulate much of this, so FS or not, we won't be turning around energy production anytime soon, no matter which way any of us tries.

Diana
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RhythmStar

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Re:Industrial Hemp
« Reply #47 on: October 03, 2003, 07:39:07 pm »

Conversion from gas, oil or coal-fired electric plants to GT-MHR nuclear would be a boon to the environment, eliminating many tons of greenhouse gas emissions and smog, without evicting a single indigenous species.

RS, there would be no need to truck new equipment in and old out? No need to build new facilities? What kinds of emissions are there while creating the new equipment and doing the conversion? It can't be zero.

Who said anything about zero?  It helps to stay within the same scope when discussing specific claims.  My quotation is about comparing the relative environmental impact of GT-MHR nuclear versus massive hemp production for biomass, in particular in quantities sufficient to replace our fossil fuel dependency.  People tend to discount today's new nuclear technology based on 3-Mile Island era complaints.  They also tend to take it on faith that growing hemp (or any large-scale agriculture) is more environmentally friendly.  Both are unfortunate acts, as GT-MHR is environmentally sound (if not closed-loop) AND less disruptive of nature than any large-scale agriculture we know of.  We can't convert all fossil fuel use to nuclear, be we sure can put a huge dent in it, particularly in the area of electricity production.


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And some species are going to be evicted/disrupted for our continued existence, no matter how few of us there are. Unless you are planning to pass laws moving towards zero population growth (and enforce them), there will be no way humans will not continue to disrupt the environment in some way and to a greater degree most likely. All creatures do, even the ones you want to save.

All people die too, but that's no reason to go around killing them indiscriminately.  It is possible to use the environment wisely and to meet our needs without turning the planet into a giant checkerboard of concrete and monoculture cultivation.

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All of this talk of hemp production is great, I am all for it. However, the feds still regulate much of this, so FS or not, we won't be turning around energy production anytime soon, no matter which way any of us tries.

Diana

Agreed.  Still, legalizing hemp production in NH will provide a good front from which to fight the good fight.  Economic and environmental arguments are harder for social conservatives to discount than personal choice.  

Hemp, when grown for its more realistic purposes such as fiber and oil production, is a fine crop.  In moderation, I'm sure it makes a fine biomass feedstock as well.  My only caution on that point is based on scalability -- energy farming is a small-to-medium energy solution, not the basis of national fossil fuel independence.

RS
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BillG

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Re:Industrial Hemp
« Reply #48 on: October 03, 2003, 08:23:19 pm »

Thought this article entitled "A new corn-based plastic disappears into the dirt" might add to the discussion:

http://www.csmonitor.com/2003/0904/p12s02-sten.html

excerpt:

"A new line of corn-based plastics, called polylactides or PLA, has begun to land on supermarket shelves. Its strongest selling points are that it fully degrades in 47 days, doesn't emit toxic fumes when incinerated, and requires 20 to 50 percent less fossil fuel to manufacture than regular plastics."
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