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Author Topic: Belgian living in the UK  (Read 8848 times)

derfy26

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Belgian living in the UK
« on: December 16, 2010, 06:02:28 pm »

Hey guys,

I'm in my final year at university, completing a BSc in Economics.

I'm a Belgian national, but have been living in the UK for almost 3 years now (with holidays spent abroad with parents). Also, before becoming Belgian nationals, my parents immigrated from Russia when the Soviet Union collapsed. My English is better than my Russian though, since that is the language I've been educated in.

I've been wanting to immigrate to the U.S. for three years now, and every year I spend in the UK just makes me want to immigrate even more (I can imagine how bad that makes the UK sound, huh). I've been aware of the FSP for well over 4 years now, before I seriously started thinking about moving to the U.S., and it's just occurred to me now, if I'm going to move, why not settle near some liberty minded individuals in one of the freest places on earth, and help out with a good cause? fyi, i'm a voluntaryist.

I do speak Russian fluently, and could easily improve the written component if required. I also speak a fair bit of French (though my grammar is frankly terrible) after living in Belgium for most of my life. For what it's worth, I also did a summer internship at JP Morgan, but I have no other official work experience.

I understand the only way I can obtain a green card is through a job, so, how likely is it that I will be able to find a job with my credentials? I have no high expectations of jobs coming from an Economics degree, and would be quite willing to do any job that has at least some prospect of career advancement, though I suppose this need not necessarily be the job I immigrate for.

Also, whatever expenses need to be incurred to obtain a green card, I will likely be able to pay for.

Thanks if anyone bothered to read this and to whomever replies :)


p.s. would applying for jobs online be plausible and likely of any success?
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derfy26

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Re: Belgian living in the UK
« Reply #1 on: December 16, 2010, 06:37:49 pm »

Also (although it's not really relevant to getting a job) I like cold weather much more than hot weather  ;D
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Dreepa

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Re: Belgian living in the UK
« Reply #2 on: December 16, 2010, 07:43:32 pm »

welcome to the forum

( I have no advice about immigrating... but I do speak Russian... :)  )
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derfy26

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Re: Belgian living in the UK
« Reply #3 on: January 10, 2011, 02:45:08 pm »

welcome to the forum

( I have no advice about immigrating... but I do speak Russian... :)  )

Thanks :)
I think there was even a Belarussian somewhere on the forum asking about immigration. I've lived some time in Belarus.

Anyway, does nobody have any ideas or feedback?

I've also been thinking about Boston as a place to find work, as it's pretty close by! (Google maps tells me under an hours drive) More and bigger international companies located there and might be easier to find a job. Then, once I'm on-site so to speak, it would be easier to look for jobs in NH. What do you guys & gals think?
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Ricardo

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Re: Belgian living in the UK
« Reply #4 on: January 12, 2011, 06:30:01 am »

Try the diversity lottery on next Autumn:

http://www.dvlottery.state.gov/

That's what I have done on the two last years.

Other way is invest a considerable amount of money on a business on USA and then you could get a visa.

Read this thread, you can get some useful ideas:

http://forum.freestateproject.org/index.php?topic=19818.0
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creaganlios

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Re: Belgian living in the UK
« Reply #5 on: January 12, 2011, 07:21:22 am »

Online job searches (monster, career builder, etc) tend to flood you with a lot of crap.   The easiest way to immigrate to the US is to locate acompany who will apply to immigration for your green card on your behalf, making the arguement that you possess unique skills.  For instance, a FInancial firm that does business in Russia would be the perfect candidate: they could claim they need someone fluent in Russian with a work and academic background such as yours.  When the company makes the request, immigration moves swiftly.  I did this once for an Anglican cleric from England, claiming that his background in Boarding Schools and Anglican theology *uniquely* prepared him to work as the driector of an organization that worked with youth in borarding schools here in the US.

Do not discount your Economics degree (I have a BS in Economics myself) - it is an open door for *many* fields here, including civil engineering, finance & banking, securities, import-export businesses, etc.
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derfy26

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Re: Belgian living in the UK
« Reply #6 on: January 12, 2011, 07:26:04 am »

Online job searches (monster, career builder, etc) tend to flood you with a lot of crap.   The easiest way to immigrate to the US is to locate acompany who will apply to immigration for your green card on your behalf, making the arguement that you possess unique skills.  For instance, a FInancial firm that does business in Russia would be the perfect candidate: they could claim they need someone fluent in Russian with a work and academic background such as yours.  When the company makes the request, immigration moves swiftly.  I did this once for an Anglican cleric from England, claiming that his background in Boarding Schools and Anglican theology *uniquely* prepared him to work as the driector of an organization that worked with youth in borarding schools here in the US.

Do not discount your Economics degree (I have a BS in Economics myself) - it is an open door for *many* fields here, including civil engineering, finance & banking, securities, import-export businesses, etc.

Thanks Thom S, and Ricardo.

I'll be updating my C.V. today and doing some more research into companies.
I'm quite interested in the import-export and civil engineering actually, less so in the finance. Would I need any more qualifications or do companies just provide on-the-job training? Thanks for the motivating words!
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John

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Re: Belgian living in the UK
« Reply #7 on: January 12, 2011, 07:44:41 am »

Hello. Welcome. And, yes Boston (and elsewhere in Ma.) is a commute which a very large number of NH folks do every day.
When I moved to NH in 2004, I stayed down in Salem for several years and commuted to Peabody, Ma.
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creaganlios

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Re: Belgian living in the UK
« Reply #8 on: January 12, 2011, 10:02:08 am »

Thanks Thom S, and Ricardo.

I'll be updating my C.V. today and doing some more research into companies.
I'm quite interested in the import-export and civil engineering actually, less so in the finance. Would I need any more qualifications or do companies just provide on-the-job training? Thanks for the motivating words!

For an entry-level position, many will provide the training.  For instance, if you joined a civil engineering firm with an economics background, they might be able to utilize you for working on private development proects that require government approval.  These firms hire an array of individuals, from landscape architects to traffic planners to hydrology experts.  Economics is a foot inthe door; often they willtrain you in the software for the rest....
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Ricardo

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Re: Belgian living in the UK
« Reply #9 on: January 17, 2011, 05:43:25 am »

Online job searches (monster, career builder, etc) tend to flood you with a lot of crap.   The easiest way to immigrate to the US is to locate acompany who will apply to immigration for your green card on your behalf, making the arguement that you possess unique skills.  For instance, a FInancial firm that does business in Russia would be the perfect candidate: they could claim they need someone fluent in Russian with a work and academic background such as yours.  When the company makes the request, immigration moves swiftly.  I did this once for an Anglican cleric from England, claiming that his background in Boarding Schools and Anglican theology *uniquely* prepared him to work as the driector of an organization that worked with youth in borarding schools here in the US.

Do not discount your Economics degree (I have a BS in Economics myself) - it is an open door for *many* fields here, including civil engineering, finance & banking, securities, import-export businesses, etc.

But nowadays that process is very difficult because of the pressure of the unemployment. I read on other forum about immigration that in such cases the immigration services are lingering months and months and at the end most of the H visas are denied.

Other way, would be: make some vacations at USA, fell in love with an American girl  ;D, marry, and eventually you would get your visa.
« Last Edit: January 17, 2011, 06:25:02 am by Ricardo »
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Phil_in_Belgium

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Re: Belgian living in the UK
« Reply #10 on: February 06, 2011, 01:33:15 pm »

I live in Brussels and I'm also planning to move to NH.

I applied last year and this year for the DV lottery at www.dvlottery.state.gov . But I'm not hopping too much from this lottery. An other lottery occurs with the H1-B visa, but I haven't got too much info about it at the time. But all the information can be found here http://e3visa.info/ .

The H1B visa is the visa you want. An employer can ask for one for you if he thinks  you are worth it. (there is a list of the companies who gives the most H1B visa, most are in IT).

For the moment, I'm putting money aside. Once I'll have enough money to live a few month in New Hampshire, I will go and hope to find a job within those few month.

The H1B visa is valid for 3 years after that you can renew it for an other 3 years. After that you have to quit your job in the US for at least one year before asking for an other H1B visa.

So the only 2 solutions you have for a stable life in the US (if you do not get a green card) is to either find your American Soul mate (or a female American ready to get married for money) or join the military (after 2 years of legal residency). The second option doesn't sound very libertarian but sometimes you got to use the system as it is!

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Phil

John

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Re: Belgian living in the UK
« Reply #11 on: February 08, 2011, 04:50:45 pm »

or join the military (after 2 years of legal residency). The second option doesn't sound very libertarian but sometimes you got to use the system as it is!


Selling out on the way in? Oh, brother.
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Peaceful Assembly Church at 860 Main St. Grafton, NH is open to all Peaceful people regardless of faith.
 
http://freestateproject.org/about/essay_archive/let_me_call_you_home.php

WAR IS OVER! - IF YOU WANT IT.

Phil_in_Belgium

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Re: Belgian living in the UK
« Reply #12 on: February 10, 2011, 12:57:23 pm »

It is either that or you are going home a soon as the H1B visa expires

Besides, it is also far easier being a US cititizen if you plan to live in the US. You get higner taxes as a foreigners and the elections processes are heavely regulated.
« Last Edit: February 10, 2011, 01:02:05 pm by Phil_in_Belgium »
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