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Author Topic: What FSP Means to Me  (Read 4109 times)

mikegags

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What FSP Means to Me
« on: August 11, 2002, 10:34:03 pm »

And to me, apart from the "Which State" topics, this is ALL that matters at this point.

My 6yo (Alex, looks just like me, but I digress  :)) saw a commercial about the USS Constitution on TV. Yes, the USS Constitution, the one named after that little piece of paper that obviously just a few of us realize the true meaning of (never mind actually read. I carry a copy in my book bag. Where is YOUR copy?). He wanted to see the "army ship" and being the good Dad that I am (I grew up in MA, never saw Ol' Ironsides TBH, I now live in NH) I took him to see it today.

We arrive in Boston, park the car and walk to the Charlestown Navy Yard National Park. I guess the barbed-wire fences and anti-vehicle barriers should have warned me, but since it was a US Navy yard to me some security was expected.

We checked out the area and saw a line forming for the ship itself. Not too long of a line yet, so I worked us over that way and waited like everyone else. Not too bad I thought, even considering it was 90+ degrees out. Alex was excited and therefore so was I.

As we stood there I began to look around. I began to notice Jersey barries and more fences. Then my heart sank and my jaw dropped.

Not 20' from where we stood, under a small tent with clear plastic walls I saw the tables. And next to the tables I saw the 'doorways'. I said nothing at first. I listened and observed. No one else seemed to notice and if they did they said nothing (I, depressingly, had no other adult to talk to). Alex and I waited and I watched and listened. Soon some "park ranger" brought out trays to those visitors at the front of the line. She warned (I prefer 'threatened') the rest of us in line that if we had "knives, scissors or other sharp objects" to say so now, or she would confiscate them at the check point. I said nothing, but my gut burned. TBH, I envisioned how easily a car key or credit card might slit someone's (Ok, her) throat but then, these measures aren't about accomplishing anything, and its not like I'd know what to do with a car key.

Alex and I goofed around and the line moved. I was good (?) and restrained myself, for fear of being seperated from or spooking my son (once I begin to rant there is NO turning me back).

I observed some Asian tourists being handed a tray, "Read the leaflet in the bottom" she said. They asked a question about their camera. "Does anyone here read English?" she said. "Yes" they said, in better english than I hear from many others. "Oh," embarassingly, "then all of your questions will be answered by the leaflet." She moved on.

Finally Alex and I received our tray. I immediately read the leaflet. No RSA or other MA or US code was referenced. "We are looking for weapons, explosives and contraband" the paper stated. Yet no one questioned the illegal search and seizure. We were all guilty of being innocent, lest we offend the guilty. The couple in front of us placed their wallets, cameras, jewelry (necklaces!), watches and keys in the tray. I placed my keys in our tray. My heart raced and my head spun. I was alone and only I understood the gravity of what was happening (You should see me at an airport! Yet, after more than a dozen boardings, I have yet to be "violated").

My only protest (Yes, I was weak, and I hate myself for conceding, but what about Alex?!?!?!) was to ignore the instructions which told me to place my credit cards on the tray.

Then Alex spoke up. "What's that for?" Ah, the curiosity of a child. "Thank You Alex" I thought to myself. Here was my chance. We're in the middle of a small crowd: as loud as I could, without yelling, I stated "Alex, this tray allows us to sacrifice the very rights that this ship once stood for." I didn't care that he didn't understand. No one else cared either. What did I expect? I don't know. Maybe someone else to snicker and at least acknowledge the irony of it all. Not one. A few people looked at me. I can't read minds and I won't attempt to.

I was nauseous now. My heart raced. I hoped they would ask why I had no wallet or cards on the tray as our turn came to be violated. My answer was planned: "Since you don't trust me, I see no reason to trust you." I was asked if I carried any change or a belt. I lifted my shirt (I don't wear belts :() and walked through the 'doorway'. "What is this, Dad?" Alex asked. Another chance. "Alex, this is where they treat us like criminals. People fought and died on this ship so we could can stand here and be searched like prisoners." Again, no one seemed to care (Alex was impressed enough by the 'fought and died' line...). I was handed my keys and into another line we went to wait for the next tour group. I was anxious and my heart was racing. I needed to scream. I wanted to get in their faces and ask what was wrong with them?!? Why didn't they care?!?  :'(

Instead I was a good American ??? and just went along with the crowd.  :-[


If you think *any* form of safety or security is more important than freedom then please go away. I don't want you here. TBH, I hope FSP doesn't want you here.

If you are sick, as I am, of worrying about losing our kids or other freedoms simply because we know our rights and dare to question "authority", then join the FSP.
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"Of liberty I would say that, in the whole plenitude of its extent, it is unobstructed action according to our will.  But rightful liberty is unobstructed action according to our will within limits drawn around us by the equal rights of others."

Thomas Jefferson

amyday

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Re:What FSP Means to Me
« Reply #1 on: August 11, 2002, 11:11:08 pm »

I am also in NH, hi. I flew this year, and had to go through the violations that are now routine at airports. Like you, I went through with it and did what I was told. Unlike you, I didn't say anything. I just did what I was told, like a good little sheep. I didn't know what I could do, they were going to search us, or we were not getting on the plane. I hate my loss of freedom, and I want to be free. I hope a slice of liberty can be carved out by the FSP.
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mikegags

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Re:What FSP Means to Me
« Reply #2 on: August 13, 2002, 07:36:18 am »


I am also in NH, hi. I flew this year, and had to go through the violations that are now routine at airports. Like you, I went through with it and did what I was told. Unlike you, I didn't say anything. I just did what I was told, like a good little sheep. I didn't know what I could do, they were going to search us, or we were not getting on the plane. I hate my loss of freedom, and I want to be free. I hope a slice of liberty can be carved out by the FSP.

It was *really* sad, Amyday. They searched everyone and everything. No random stuff like at the airport. Every bag, camera and stroller.

The Navy guys I can forgive - they are just following orders. But the park rangers were on a power trip. It was obvious, yet no one seemed to care. It is absolutely beyond me how anyone would rather be secure than free.

If I am free I can, for the most part, provide for my own security.

Let's hope this movement can make a difference.
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"Of liberty I would say that, in the whole plenitude of its extent, it is unobstructed action according to our will.  But rightful liberty is unobstructed action according to our will within limits drawn around us by the equal rights of others."

Thomas Jefferson
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