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Author Topic: Fluoride in water in NH?  (Read 19939 times)

teemuv

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Re: Fluoride in water in NH?
« Reply #15 on: December 13, 2010, 11:08:43 am »

While having water (tap or well) free from fluoride, I'd remind people to periodically check water quality. There are other nasty stuffs added to make tap water good enough to qualify as drinking water. My home town published statistics from their (several) treatment plants and the quality (how much chloride etc. was in added) changed depending on rain and other such things.

The safest bet is to use water purification. I can say for certain, that the very basic model what I use makes water drinkable compared to untreated. Fluoride is not that easy to get removed, but chloride can be quite easily removed. I could smell and taste it from my tap water.
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FSmember1111

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Re: Fluoride in water in NH?
« Reply #16 on: April 24, 2014, 08:15:51 pm »

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Manchester is fluoridated.   Beware that sometimes poison is good for you as in the case of penicillin but comes with side effects.   I also think low intake of alcohol can be beneficial.  Personally I'm revulsed by fluoride in water.

http://des.nh.gov/organization/commissioner/pip/factsheets/dwgb/index.htm


Drinking Water Quality: Contaminants

    WD-DWGB-3-2 Arsenic in Drinking Water
    WD-DWGB-3-3 Beryllium in Drinking Water
    WD-DWGB-3-4 Corrosivity of Water Supplies
    WD-DWGB-3-5 Fluoride in Drinking Water
    WD-DWGB-3-6 Hardness in Drinking Water
    WD-DWGB-3-8 Iron and/or Manganese in Drinking Water
    WD-DWGB-3-9 Nitrate/Nitrite in Drinking Water
    WD-DWGB-3-10 Organics in Drinking Water
    WD-DWGB-3-11 Mineral Radioactivity in Drinking Water
    WD-DWGB-3-12 Radon in Air and Water: An Overview for Homeowners
    WD-DWGB-3-14 Sand and Sediment in Drinking Water
    WD-DWGB-3-15 Taste and Odor in Drinking Water
    WD-DWGB-3-16 Hydrogen Sulfide in Drinking Water
    WD-DWGB-3-17 Sodium and Chloride in Drinking Water
    WD-DWGB-3-18 Air Bubbles in Drinking Water
    WD-DWGB-3-19 MtBE in Drinking Water
    WD-DWGB-3-21 Iron Bacteria In Drinking Water
    WD-DWGB-3-22 Arsenic Removal and Disposal for Public Water Systems
    WD-DWGB-3-23 Overview of the Lead and Copper Rule
    WD-DWGB-3-24 1,4-Dioxane and Drinking Water

Water Quality: Microbiological Contaminants

    WD-DWGB-4-1 Interpreting the Presence of Coliform Bacteria
    WD-DWGB 4-2 Causes of Positive Bacteria Results in Water Samples
    WD-DWGB-4-3 Disinfecting Public Water Systems
    WD-DWGB-4-4 Giardiasis in Drinking Water
    WD-DWGB-4-5 Utraviolet Water Disinfection
    WD-DWGB-4-6 Cryptosporidium in Drinking Water Wells
    WD-DWGB-4-8 Boil Water Advisories
    WD-DWGB-4-11 Disinfecting a Private Well
    WD-DWGB-4-12 Frequently Asked Questions About Boil Orders
    WD-DWGB-4-14 Bacterial Staining Of Water Use Fixtures
    WD-DWGB-4-15 Cyanobacteria and Drinking Water: Guidance for Public Water Systems

Water Quality: Fluoride

    WD-DWGB-5-1 NH Public Water Systems that Add Fluoride                      *********************
    WD-DWGB-5-2 Small PWSs in NH with Naturally Occuring Fluoride (1995)
    WD-DWGB-5-3 Proposing to Add Fluoride to a PWS
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Libertard

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Re: Fluoride in water in NH?
« Reply #17 on: August 10, 2014, 08:31:38 pm »

With the risk of stirring up a shit-storm, I must mention here that fluoridation of drinking water has been shown to be completely safe as currently practiced. Fluoridated water is not a "poison." There is a very small chance of very young children being overexposed and developing dental fluorosis, an aesthetic ailment of the teeth with no adverse health effects; however, the positive effect on public dental health far outweighs this small risk, especially considering the links observed between poor dental health and general health/life expectancy. We have a sample size of many millions of people over several decades from which to draw these conclusions. Like any public health measure, in the end it is about risk versus benefit. Here, the benefit outweighs the risk by orders of magnitude.

I can understand arguing against fluoridation on the grounds of informed consent, or even by questioning the whole notion of a "public health measure." But to call fluoridated water "poison" is simply incorrect... a popular, unscientific misconception. You might as well campaign against calcium-fortified orange juice, iodized salt, vitamin D fortified milk, folic acid enriched flour, and fortified breakfast cereals while you're at it.
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TJames

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Re: Fluoride in water in NH?
« Reply #18 on: August 10, 2014, 09:12:54 pm »

With the risk of stirring up a shit-storm, I must mention here that fluoridation of drinking water has been shown to be completely safe as currently practiced. Fluoridated water is not a "poison." There is a very small chance of very young children being overexposed and developing dental fluorosis, an aesthetic ailment of the teeth with no adverse health effects; however, the positive effect on public dental health far outweighs this small risk, especially considering the links observed between poor dental health and general health/life expectancy. We have a sample size of many millions of people over several decades from which to draw these conclusions. Like any public health measure, in the end it is about risk versus benefit. Here, the benefit outweighs the risk by orders of magnitude.

I can understand arguing against fluoridation on the grounds of informed consent, or even by questioning the whole notion of a "public health measure." But to call fluoridated water "poison" is simply incorrect... a popular, unscientific misconception. You might as well campaign against calcium-fortified orange juice, iodized salt, vitamin D fortified milk, folic acid enriched flour, and fortified breakfast cereals while you're at it.

I think as the movement grows the paranoid fringe elements will step back.
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Eric Freerock

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Re: Fluoride in water in NH?
« Reply #19 on: August 11, 2014, 11:58:53 am »

Get a Reverse Osmosis unit if you're worried about drinking it.  But last i check tea leaves accumulate fluoride to the point of a single cup of tea has more fluoride in it than like a gallon of treated water.  Not a big deal.

jrandall

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Re: Fluoride in water in NH?
« Reply #20 on: September 29, 2014, 02:27:19 pm »

Here's a list of municipalities which fluoridate, courtesy of NH DEC:
http://des.nh.gov/organization/commissioner/pip/factsheets/dwgb/documents/dwgb-5-1.pdf

Or search by town at CDC:
http://apps.nccd.cdc.gov/MWF/CountyDataV.asp?State=NH

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jrandall

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Re: Fluoride in water in NH?
« Reply #21 on: September 29, 2014, 08:22:43 pm »

Here's a list of municipalities which fluoridate, courtesy of NH DEC:

I added up the numbers in that first link and got roughly 300k people.  Therefore about 22% of NH's 1.3 million people are served by fluorinated water sources.  No idea how that compares to other states. 

Hope this helps.
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freedomroad

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Re: Fluoride in water in NH?
« Reply #22 on: September 30, 2014, 10:23:34 am »

Here's a list of municipalities which fluoridate, courtesy of NH DEC:

I added up the numbers in that first link and got roughly 300k people.  Therefore about 22% of NH's 1.3 million people are served by fluorinated water sources.  No idea how that compares to other states. 

Hope this helps.

That's perhaps by government adding to the water source. Plenty of small towns in NH have at least some amount of fluoride in the water, naturally. That isn't just something unique to NH, either.
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anon37268573

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Re: Fluoride in water in NH?
« Reply #23 on: October 01, 2014, 12:55:58 pm »

Most of New Hampshire is towns, not cities. In Derry, which I believe is the largest town in the state (and would be the 5th(?) largest city in the state if it was a city), I have well water like most non-city dwellers do in New Hampshire.
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