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Author Topic: Getting depressed about moving to NH  (Read 8406 times)

weatherford

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Re: Getting depressed about moving to NH
« Reply #15 on: December 23, 2009, 09:44:40 pm »

Yes, I am working with a realtor and most of what I am going by are the listed taxes...

For example:

$326,000 - 3BR house 2700 sq ft (that includes the garage) 3 yrs old - big house, yes, but not huge and fancy - just a fairly nice new house - modern looking And it has two sump pumps in the basement, as it flooded on Mother's Day 2007. On 107 acres in current use (woodland) Taxes??  -$12,000 last year.

That's outrageous! There are plenty more examples.

I could easily be missing something - but most that I have seen list that they ARE in current use, and many also list that they have the veterans exemption (which I mentioned before.)

While the idea of having land and house separate is interesting, it is also a pain - plus, I like to be around my animals 24/7. I like to know if the sounds emanating from the barn aren't quite right.

I know, I know, I sound like just the whingy person you don't want around - really, I'm not.... I guess I am just traumatized by events in my own life lately, and very depressed that this move is much more difficult than I had thought.

:(  THANKS for your help!!
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frankwtodd

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Re: Getting depressed about moving to NH
« Reply #16 on: December 23, 2009, 10:17:32 pm »

I can't add much more that hasn't already been said about property taxes and current use. However, despite the increase in property taxes, you have to consider the lack of income and sales taxes as well. The overall picture is important. As you have income or inheritance outside of the US (it seems), it may be best to leave that is trust outside the use. Consult an international tax attorney. However, the West is getting pretty greedy when it comes to taxes. No matter where you live.

All that said, let me toss this out. My reason for moving to NH (which is still in the planning stages) is not necessarily for what I can gain today. Although that is important as well. It is for the changes the FSP can implement and make the life of my children that much better. I am in the FSP for change, both now and for those that come after. I doubt I will see the repudiation of the modern welfare state in my lifetime. It would be nice. But to be able to help lay the foundation for its ultimate repudiation...count me in.

It may not be economically feasible, or desirable. However, you may find other intangible benefits to moving to NH. Me, personally, I can't wait to get my family up in the land o' the porcs!
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weatherford

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Re: Getting depressed about moving to NH
« Reply #17 on: December 23, 2009, 11:30:13 pm »

ah, frankwtodd, if I had family, I would have been there back around number 100 (or before!)

The fact that this is some place where perhaps I can still create change... well, that remains very appealing, even though I haven't been an active activist since my 60's youth, but the urge has returned with a vengence... ;)

;)

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maxxoccupancy

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Re: Getting depressed about moving to NH
« Reply #18 on: December 24, 2009, 01:42:45 am »

Just come out to New Hampshire, eh.  If you're not happy with what you're getting, try this for a year and see what you get.  Seabrook is a relative tax haven, and you can get a couple of acres on the west side of I-95 for not too much money.  Also, the winters are milder out here on the coast, so the horses will thank you.

BTW, my property taxes are less than $300 a month, and pretty much everything (parking, recycling, sewer, water, garbage pickup, library stuff, etc) are included in all of that.
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Dreepa

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Re: Getting depressed about moving to NH
« Reply #19 on: December 24, 2009, 07:49:28 am »

Yes, I am working with a realtor and most of what I am going by are the listed taxes...

For example:

$326,000 - 3BR house 2700 sq ft (that includes the garage) 3 yrs old - big house, yes, but not huge and fancy - just a fairly nice new house - modern looking And it has two sump pumps in the basement, as it flooded on Mother's Day 2007. On 107 acres in current use (woodland) Taxes??  -$12,000 last year.

That's outrageous! There are plenty more examples.

I could easily be missing something - but most that I have seen list that they ARE in current use, and many also list that they have the veterans exemption (which I mentioned before.)

While the idea of having land and house separate is interesting, it is also a pain - plus, I like to be around my animals 24/7. I like to know if the sounds emanating from the barn aren't quite right.

I know, I know, I sound like just the whingy person you don't want around - really, I'm not.... I guess I am just traumatized by events in my own life lately, and very depressed that this move is much more difficult than I had thought.

:(  THANKS for your help!!

It also varies by town...
Also the vet exemption is prob just saying that you CAN get a vet exemption in that town. (Not all towns have enacted the law to allow it and the amount varies by town)
$12K for a year on that house sounds a little high.. so I am going to guess that it is a town with a 'good' school district.
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taxed unfairly

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Re: Getting depressed about moving to NH
« Reply #20 on: December 24, 2009, 08:18:17 am »


Third, the 5% tax on investment income. No one has mentioned this before - what do retirees do? Keep their money stashed in their mattresses? Yes, I would LOVE to go totally cash and off the grid, but I can't - I am stuck with a small investment income (to which I add my income from writing).
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If you want to focus your activism on getting that 5% investment tax repealed, I'd be happy to help you.  I'm also effected by that law.  Perhaps, we could start by getting a reasonable exemption in place (i.e. no interest and dividends tax on investment income under $250,000 per hear. with the $250K figure tied to CPI inflation figures so that it automatically adjusts upward each year.)

   - anon

OKay, count me in.
I just got hit with 7 years worth of tax on my interest and dividends that we live off. (retired)
We do not earn enough to pay Federal tax.
House tax is $10k per year.
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maxxoccupancy

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Re: Getting depressed about moving to NH
« Reply #21 on: December 24, 2009, 04:22:23 pm »

Vote out the big tax and spenders.  If we could kill these people's political careers when they just get started in local politics, they wouldn't be able to run for State House--or anything else, for that matter.
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John Edward Mercier

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Re: Getting depressed about moving to NH
« Reply #22 on: December 24, 2009, 09:10:30 pm »

Sounds more like the house/property is selling for much less than assessment.

You can work to remove/limit State taxes... but at a certain point it will need to be offset with cuts to municipal granting. So you'll need to keep a firm grip on local/county expenditures.
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Keyser Soce

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Re: Getting depressed about moving to NH
« Reply #23 on: December 26, 2009, 12:13:16 pm »


Third, the 5% tax on investment income. No one has mentioned this before - what do retirees do? Keep their money stashed in their mattresses? Yes, I would LOVE to go totally cash and off the grid, but I can't - I am stuck with a small investment income (to which I add my income from writing).
Quote
If you want to focus your activism on getting that 5% investment tax repealed, I'd be happy to help you.  I'm also effected by that law.  Perhaps, we could start by getting a reasonable exemption in place (i.e. no interest and dividends tax on investment income under $250,000 per hear. with the $250K figure tied to CPI inflation figures so that it automatically adjusts upward each year.)

   - anon

OKay, count me in.


Welcome.  8)
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dave walthour

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Re: Getting depressed about moving to NH
« Reply #24 on: December 26, 2009, 08:24:02 pm »

To spell out current use a little more fully, if you own more than 10 acres, then the only portion you  pay significant taxes on is the portion that contains the house, barns, driveway, and other buildings used for living.  With most people that is about 2 acres, or less.  So you can own 100 acres and only pay normal residential taxes on 2 acres.  I knew someone who owned 28 acres in Hanover NH quite high taxes.  The land was all in current use, since it was only used for grazing horses.  Their annual tax was $57.00/year.  That is the kind of savings you can see with current use.  Agriculture, potential logging, hunting, all of these are allowed with very low tax rates.  So if you own a 100 acre farm, your taxes on the house and apertinent structures is quite low compared to the amount of land you would own, and use.

Also, as many have mentioned, some towns have considerably less tax burden than others.

I would love to help.  Check out www.DaveSellsNH.com and see a lot of info on the state.

Thanks,
Dave
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freedomroad

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Re: Getting depressed about moving to NH
« Reply #25 on: December 26, 2009, 10:00:36 pm »

Thanks Dave for giving a great example.
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FerretDad

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Re: Getting depressed about moving to NH
« Reply #26 on: January 01, 2010, 06:54:02 am »

There is lots available for horse property. This one just had a price change:

http://www.masiello.com/real-estate/nh/sullivan/2800239.cfm

Not lots of acreage, but has a barn and is fenced for horses.  Lots of horse resources in the area too.

(no, I'm not a realtor, but I play one on TV!)

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Porcustein

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Re: Getting depressed about moving to NH
« Reply #27 on: January 11, 2010, 09:07:06 am »

This property might be good.  I drive by it every day.  The property is nice, but the house needs some work.  If you need more land, there is a wooded lot across the street for sale.

http://nneren.com/view2.php?id=2771700&ref=r&price=$219,000.00&t=&fcla=
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