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Author Topic: NH vs WY  (Read 181033 times)

Michelle

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Re:NH vs WY - Venture Capital Investments
« Reply #75 on: June 02, 2003, 06:56:46 pm »

I posted these a long time ago on another long-lost thread, but it is relevant here. I ranked the ten states in order. The number after each state is its ranking nationwide. Besides being one of the worst in the nation, Wyoming is the ninth or tenth worst state (among ten) on overall economy, knowledge jobs, globalization, economic dynamism, innovation capacity, high-tech jobs, venture capital invested, R&D expenditures, and # of new patents. Compare this to New Hampshire which ranks among the best on nearly all of these measures.

New Economy Index
http://www.nheconomy.com/movebiz.html?clickid=57&table=categories

Overall state ranking
1=highest / 50=lowest

DE = 9
NH = 15
ID = 20
ME = 25
VT = 28
AK = 31
MT = 37
SD = 43
ND = 44
WY = 46

Knowledge jobs
1=highest / 50=lowest

NH = 8
DE = 13
ME = 17
MT = 24
AK = 27
ID = 28
VT = 37
SD = 38
ND = 40
WY = 45

Globalization
1=highest / 50=lowest

DE = 1
AK = 2
VT = 16
NH = 17
ME = 24
ID = 32
MT = 35
ND = 43
WY = 46
SD = 50

Economic Dynamism
1=highest / 50=lowest

NH = 25
ID = 29
ME = 32
VT = 36
SD = 38
AK = 39
DE = 43
MT = 45
WY = 47
ND = 50

Digital Economy
1=highest / 50=lowest

ME = 15
NH = 19
ID = 26
ND = 30
WY = 32
SD = 33
MT = 34
DE = 35
AK = 36
VT = 40

Innovation capacity
1=highest / 50=lowest

DE = 5
ID = 10
NH = 11
VT = 16
ME = 31
MT = 33
ND = 38
AK = 39
SD = 46
WY = 47

High-tech jobs
1=highest / 50=lowest

NH = 3
VT = 13
ID = 14
SD = 22
DE = 32
ME = 34
MT = 38
ND = 40
AK = 44
WY = 50

Venture capital
1=highest / 50=lowest

NH = 4
ME = 20
DE = 26
VT = 29
MT = 33
ID = 41
AK = 46
SD = 48
ND = 49
WY = 49 (a tie maybe?)

R&D Expenditures (millions)
higher is better:

DE = $2,556
NH = $1340
ID = $1,127
MT = $191
VT = $175
ME = $157
ND = 119
WY = $65
SD = $60
AK = unknown

# of new patents
higher is better:

ID = 987
NH = 649
DE = 422
VT = 343
MT = 149
ME = 143
AK = 76
ND = 69
SD = 57
WY = 49


I agree with you, LeRuineur6, on all but one thing: I think the "fight" for freedom in New Hampshire will be much less challenging than you think. We are already making incredible strides with only a tiny, tiny percentage of the activists that the FSP will bring the NH. With the help of 20,000 real activists (all gainfully employed, running thriving businesses, and comfortably supporting their families  :)) the sky will be the limit.
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jgmaynard

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Re:NH vs WY - Venture Capital Investments
« Reply #76 on: June 02, 2003, 07:57:34 pm »

First, I am suprised how well Delaware ranks on those lists...

Second, there are many battles we would have to fight in other states, that we would not have to deal with in NH, eg. general sales tax, income tax, no helmet laws, no mandatory auto insurance, we won't have to get back lots of federal land, etc. etc.
There are some things which will and do need to be changed in NH, as well as ALL the other states.
That's what we will be there for... ;D
The best we can do is make a choice between a set of advantages and disadvantages.
But in NH, we get to start with what is already the smallest state Government per capita in the country, with the 2nd lowest tax rate in the country.
Plus, it should be even smaller by the time Governor Benson is finished -the Senate version of  the state budget was released today, and it lowers spending nearly across the board, pretty boldly. :D
Pay some of the smallest amount of taxes you can, have the smallest Government to shrink, and make a good living all at the same time.
Sounds like a good place to start.  
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Robert H.

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Re:NH vs WY - Venture Capital Investments
« Reply #77 on: June 03, 2003, 01:59:05 am »

In addition to the facts stated in my post, please remember that WY ranks dead last for projected job growth.  And it ties for last place in historical Venture Capital investments.

Wyoming is also the lowest population state in the country, so it's hardly surprising that it doesn't have the same number of expected jobs that higher population states do.  It's economy is also different than what you would expect to find in a northeastern state, so comparing them on that basis is not going to tell you anything that you don't already know.  Still, Wyoming's average income is well within the national average, and the cost of living and buying property there is lower than in the northeast.

Wyoming's economy is growing.  Businesses from Colorado and Utah have started relocating due to the friendly tax and regulatory environment there, and Forbes just recently ranked Cheyenne and Casper in the top twelve best small cities, nationwide, for "business and careers."  Forbes also ranked Casper and Cheyenne 1st and 2nd among small cities, nationwide, for the "cost of doing business."  See this thread for more information on the rankings and the criteria upon which they were based.  The Small Business Survival Index ranks Wyoming number three in the nation for being small business friendly.  The only FSP state to do better was South Dakota (which placed 1st). Also, FreedomRoad has posted information regarding the Fort Collins, CO MSA (about 45 minutes from Cheyenne), which has an enormous projected job growth rate.  You can find that data listed on this thread.  There are also other areas of Wyoming where commuting is suitable, if necessary.

As for elected libertarians, most libertarians run as Republicans in the west.  The Republican Liberty Caucus has rated Wyoming's congresswoman and two senators as "libertarian" in their voting records.  And Wyoming's own LP just achieved Major Party Status this last election year, which I believe is a very good indicator for a state that is already so free.  

In regard to New Hampshire financial matters overall though, I found this article to be interesting:

http://governing.com/gpp/2003/gp3nh.htm

One of the problems that the FSP would face in New Hampshire is what to do with the state's budgetary problems, which are not inconsiderable, and this could be a barrier to effecting change.  I'd rather us try dealing with a state that is more financially stable, and where major sources of revenue are not tied into political hot-button issues like education.

LeRuineur6

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Re:NH vs WY - Venture Capital Investments
« Reply #78 on: June 03, 2003, 05:46:26 pm »

Quote
Wyoming is also the lowest population state in the country, so it's hardly surprising that it doesn't have the same number of expected jobs that higher population states do.

Wait, isn't that a per-capita rating?  I'm not sure if it is, but if so, that would nullify your argument.

Also, you are talking a lot about one or two good cities in WY, but you have failed to address the problem of high-tech jobs in WY.  You seem to be holding out high hopes for WY's high-tech future, but NH already has such industries, jobs, investments, and infrastructures.

Quote
In regard to New Hampshire financial matters overall though, I found this article to be interesting:

This is the exact same problem that the VT Supreme Court created.  At about the same time as NH, the VT Supreme Court ruled that public education is unequal, and the rich should subsidize the poor.  And they also went straight for the property taxes to pay for it.  However, it is only a matter of time before they find a "fair" formula that will satisfy the Supreme Court ruling.

In the mean time, school vouchers would help quite a bit to alleviate the many problems caused by public schools, and I'll have to look into the issue of whether or not NH is pursuing this solution, and what other solutions it may be pursuing.

Funding equality in public education is a problem that many states are about to face as similar rulings begin to occur all over the country.  And it is our job as Porcupines use our boldness and creativity to find solutions these problems in the Free State.
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Re:NH vs WY - Venture Capital Investments
« Reply #79 on: June 03, 2003, 09:48:23 pm »

In the mean time, school vouchers would help quite a bit to alleviate the many problems caused by public schools, and I'll have to look into the issue of whether or not NH is pursuing this solution, and what other solutions it may be pursuing.

I hope not.  Vouchers are anti-libertarian to a tee.  All government vouchers do is expand the problems of what you call 'public schools.'  I (and I hope most people in the FSP) will never support any form of government vouchers.  Now, many parts of the country already use private vouchers and these work great.

Quote
Funding equality in public education is a problem that many states are about to face as similar rulings begin to occur all over the country.  And it is our job as Porcupines use our boldness and creativity to find solutions these problems in the Free State.
 

This is even a problem in TN, my home state.  Now, it is really not funding equality in TN, the state courts ruled that all teachers through out the state have to make the same amount.  This is really not possible without a tax increase.  Either way, it seems everywhere you go, there is a court doing bad things.  
« Last Edit: June 03, 2003, 09:50:16 pm by FreedomRoad »
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Rearden

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Re:NH vs WY - Venture Capital Investments
« Reply #80 on: June 04, 2003, 01:34:49 am »

In regard to New Hampshire financial matters overall though, I found this article to be interesting:

http://governing.com/gpp/2003/gp3nh.htm

One of the problems that the FSP would face in New Hampshire is what to do with the state's budgetary problems, which are not inconsiderable, and this could be a barrier to effecting change.  I'd rather us try dealing with a state that is more financially stable, and where major sources of revenue are not tied into political hot-button issues like education.

This was a great article, filled with many terrific reasons why we should choose NH.  In dealing with your assertion that NH has budgetary problems, the fact remains that NH already has a significantly smaller government than Wyoming, or any other state for that matter.  Not only is the NH budget balanced for 2004, but the property tax was substantially lowered!  As the article said, any politician who dared to suggest that new tax revenue might be needed lost by huge margins!  The fact that education is tied into taxes is actually a big plus for NH, as the people are hungry for alternatives, such as property tax credits for private schooling or homeschooling.  Similar to the federal intervention in the west, this issue has people pissed!  

Robert, your post hints that NH will likely raise taxes to deal with their budget shortfall.  The truth is that NH has already dealt with their comparatively small shortfall, WITH CUTS!  

Come to NH in June and meet the man who did it -- closet libertarian Governor Craig Benson.  I'll buy you a beer if you make the trip.

Keith
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Re:NH vs WY - Venture Capital Investments
« Reply #81 on: June 04, 2003, 02:34:28 am »

Quote
Wyoming is also the lowest population state in the country, so it's hardly surprising that it doesn't have the same number of expected jobs that higher population states do.

Wait, isn't that a per-capita rating?  I'm not sure if it is, but if so, that would nullify your argument.

I'm not sure if it's per-capita or not, but a state with more than twice Wyoming's population should logically have more jobs available.  

Quote
Also, you are talking a lot about one or two good cities in WY, but you have failed to address the problem of high-tech jobs in WY.  You seem to be holding out high hopes for WY's high-tech future, but NH already has such industries, jobs, investments, and infrastructures.

I don't know how many of us work in the high-tech industry, but that's only one job sector.  New Hampshire does have more of this than Wyoming, but our primary emphasis is on what state would be easier for liberty in our lifetime.  I don't think focusing on the high-tech job sector tells us much about that.  This is not to say that the desires of those in the high-tech industry should be ignored (I work in the industry myself), but it's more a matter of asking where our activists could do the most good in the most reasonable amount of time.

Many who live in southern New Hampshire are also dependent upon the Boston area job market, and I was surprised to find out that Craig Benson's company (Enterasys) moved to Andover, MA in March because they needed access to a broader pool of executive "talent" that they were unable to find in New Hampshire, even in spite of the higher tax burden.  I don't know how much Benson controls the day-to-day operation of the company, but the CEO put it this way:  "The talent is the lifeblood of our business, and if it costs you a few more dollars in taxes to do it, that's well worth it. You are more than going to make it up in access to the intellectual capital you have here.''

I pulled that from the Boston Globe back in March.  I don't have the link, but I can search it if you need it.  I don't hold this against Benson (it was probably a board decision, and a company needs to go where it can do the best), I was just surprised to see a business go south of the NH/MA line in order to do better.  I thought more of the talent would be migrating north to escape Taxachusetts.  I'd also hate to have any tech company I worked for up and move to Kennedyland; I'd have no intention of going with it.

Quote
Quote
In regard to New Hampshire financial matters overall though, I found this article to be interesting:

This is the exact same problem that the VT Supreme Court created.  At about the same time as NH, the VT Supreme Court ruled that public education is unequal, and the rich should subsidize the poor.  And they also went straight for the property taxes to pay for it.  However, it is only a matter of time before they find a "fair" formula that will satisfy the Supreme Court ruling.

Yes, Act 60 - not a pretty piece of legislation at all.  Act 60 goes about the redistribution in a different manner, but it amounts to about the same thing.  From my research, it appears that New England has traditionally depended on property taxation to fund public education, only it used to be locally based before the state level redistributionists declared it "unfair".   ::)

Robert H.

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Re:NH vs WY - Venture Capital Investments
« Reply #82 on: June 04, 2003, 03:28:13 am »

This was a great article, filled with many terrific reasons why we should choose NH.

It certainly painted a good portrait of the outlook in state government (whether it intended to or not), but it does point to some serious budgetary problems in the works.

Quote
In dealing with your assertion that NH has budgetary problems, the fact remains that NH already has a significantly smaller government than Wyoming, or any other state for that matter.

The state government sector is smaller than Wyoming's, yes, but I wouldn't say "considerably."  Wyoming has a very small state government itself compared to the other states.

Quote
Not only is the NH budget balanced for 2004, but the property tax was substantially lowered!  As the article said, any politician who dared to suggest that new tax revenue might be needed lost by huge margins!  The fact that education is tied into taxes is actually a big plus for NH, as the people are hungry for alternatives, such as property tax credits for private schooling or homeschooling.  Similar to the federal intervention in the west, this issue has people pissed!  

Well, the state budget is balanced because of $80 million coming from Washington as part of state grants that Bush agreed to support in order to get his tax cut plan passed.  They're breathing a sigh of relief over that right now!  The state House and Senate added more spending back into the budget (much more so in the Senate) than Benson wanted, but they did cut quite a few services as well in order to cut taxes and also try to keep from ballooning the deficit.  

As for the education aspect, my understanding is that the state Supreme Court mandated only that education spending be equalized across the board, which led to the state property tax being instituted.  I imagine that you could cut that tax and still maintain an equal distribution of funds, but it would be harder to eliminate it altogether.

I agree that these issues could create a favorable environment for reform of some nature, but I'm not sure what form that would take at this point.  People there definitely don't want the tax, but I'm not seeing that they question public education itself to the point where they'd be in favor of reforming the entire system to include privatization or tax breaks for private and homeschool parents.  Maybe there's more of this going on than I've come across in my research though.  In the meantime, that Supreme Court ruling is going to present an obstacle to real reform.

I think Wyoming is in a better situation to experiment with educational alternatives at this point, or at least on a more fundamental level.  They don't have a VT/NH style Supreme Court ruling for one thing, education is not as heavily tied into property taxation, and they're already closing a number of schools across the state as it is.  

Quote
Robert, your post hints that NH will likely raise taxes to deal with their budget shortfall.  The truth is that NH has already dealt with their comparatively small shortfall, WITH CUTS!  

Well, they've done it before, which is how they got the state property tax.  That was under a different administration though, and they do still face a revenue problem.  Add to that the fact that New Hampshire is the fastest growing state in New England, and something's got to give eventually.  Unless, of course, they gut the state government even further, which would be fine by me, and I'm sure by you as well.  NH Senate Republicans seem reluctant to go along with that though.  In fact, given some of their recent actions, it's difficult to view them as members of the same party as the House Republicans.

Quote
Come to NH in June and meet the man who did it -- closet libertarian Governor Craig Benson.  I'll buy you a beer if you make the trip.

I appreciate the offer.   :)  Unfortunately, finances don't permit me to make the trip right now.  Even if it did, I'm not sure I could get away.  The company I work for just went through a merger, and, in a stroke of brilliance, laid off too many people.  As a result, the rest of us are having to put in more time to make up the slack until they can hire and train some replacements.  I guess I really can't complain though, in a company that's been laying off so many people it's really nice to know that you're needed!

LeRuineur6

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Re:NH vs WY - Venture Capital Investments
« Reply #83 on: June 04, 2003, 11:23:31 am »

Quote
I don't know how many of us work in the high-tech industry, but that's only one job sector.  New Hampshire does have more of this than Wyoming, but our primary emphasis is on what state would be easier for liberty in our lifetime.

I've been trying to find the website where I read about a correlation between libertarians and high-technology and have found this article:

http://www.theadvocates.org/celebrities/internet-users.html

Influential Internet Users Solidly Libertarian
These "connected" and "superconnected" are highly influential opinion leaders who vote more often than the general population. And, according to the survey, they strongly believe in free markets, are socially tolerant, and are "more often than not" libertarians.

I think for the FSP to succeed, we must survey all of our members to get an idea of what types of jobs we will all need in the Free State or what types of businesses we will be starting there.  If the survey determines that there is a large percentage who would be looking for high-tech jobs and/or starting high-tech companies, then NH would be a far better choice than WY.

Quote
I was surprised to find out that Craig Benson's company (Enterasys) moved to Andover, MA in March because they needed access to a broader pool of executive "talent" that they were unable to find in New Hampshire, even in spite of the higher tax burden.

The business environment is strong in NH because of the very strong high-tech entrepreneurial atmosphere in MA, which is primarily derived from MA's institutions (such as MIT).  MA has more access to such talent, but NH is only a short drive, and MA's talent pool is still accessible from NH.

Don't get me wrong.  A lot of companies move to MA because of its tremendous talent pool and I was thinking of doing the same with my company a few years ago.  However, now that I know about NH, there's no way in hell I would start my business in MA.  I'll just move to Southern NH and recruit from there if I have any problems finding the talent necessary to grow my business.

As an entrepreneur starting a non-location-critical business, moving to MA simply makes no sense for my business.  That is unless my company were to eventually seek VC funding or change its business plan and form company branch locations in MA to reach specific target markets.  But I would still rather stay in the state with the greatest monetary and regulatory advantages for my business.
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LeRuineur6

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Re:NH vs WY - Venture Capital Investments
« Reply #84 on: June 04, 2003, 03:06:35 pm »

In reply to the NH Supreme Court ruling on equality in education and NH's use of property tax to fund such equality, read this:

http://www.cmonitor.com/stories/news/state2003/nh__educationfunding_2003.shtml

Arlinghaus said the poorer towns are not using enough of the money to make a real difference for education.

"Regardless of the size of your grant everybody ... essentially spent (on education) about what they would have anyway," he said.


Further:

"Local money that would have been spent on education is often given to other areas within the community," she said.

She said while this helps towns with their overall spending, it sometimes harms programs for special needs or economically disadvantaged students.

"I don't see people adding to their (school) budget, I see them maintaining their budget, which is not always the best thing to do."


So in NH, it turns out that the "donor" towns are supposedly giving money to other towns for education, but the donees are not spending that money on education, but on other unrelated expenses.

I am not aware of whether or not this is happening in VT, but it could be the same here.  This would imply that state should eventually have to mandate that those funds are to be used for education only and that anything not used on education be returned to the state's pool of funds which should be used to reduce taxes in the future.

The "donor" towns are not funding education for poorer towns, they're funding unrelated government pork for poorer towns.

When this is taken care of by state regulations (unless there's a way to delegate it to the each town), this may result in a much smaller property tax problem than some fear will occur.  In addition, when the state switches the property tax from a property-value formula to a median-income formula, this will provide more tax relief for the poorer towns.

But this is only regarding the immediate problems at hand.  Solving the problem of promoting private competition in place of "equality" in huge-government educational institutions.  Sounds like a job for some (education-oriented) entrepreneurs and some deregulation if you ask me.  But that's my solution for every problem.  LOL
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LeRuineur6

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Re:NH vs WY - Venture Capital Investments
« Reply #85 on: June 04, 2003, 03:15:39 pm »

And here are some other interesting statistics I've found on NH's high-tech rankings:

http://www.nheconomy.com/neweconomy.html?clickid=16&table=sections

New Hampshire and the New Economy are often one and the same. A few facts contribute to the continued growth of this entrepreneurial culture in the state: New Hampshire has the second highest percentage of high tech employment in the nation, ranks fourth in the U.S. in venture capital investments as a percentage of gross state product, and occupies the number nine spot in the latest Miliken Institute's New Economy Index – a key indicator of future high tech growth. In terms of innovation, New Hampshire is ranked eighth in patents per worker, sixteenth in r&d per capita, and has enjoyed an 82 percent increase in r&d spending (1993-97, national average 28 percent). Over sixteen percent of the employment in the state is in gazelle firms. Add these New Economy facts to the state’s consistently high quality rankings –three New Hampshire cities listed in Money Magazine's top ten, and New Hampshire is first in the Northeast in the Morgan Quinto ranking – and you have the ingredients for the continued growth. New Hampshire has the innovation, the entrepreneurs and the equity capital to continue this prominent role in the New Economy.
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Re:NH vs WY - Venture Capital Investments
« Reply #86 on: June 05, 2003, 01:47:24 am »

Quote
the fact remains that NH already has a significantly smaller government than Wyoming

Actually, Wyoming has a much smaller government than New Hampshire. However on a per capita basis, or as a percentage of Gross State Product (which is the measure in the spreadsheet) New Hampshire has the smaller government. I just wanted to clarify that point...

Vouchers are of course a disaster, from the viewpoint of freedom. Just another government program, subsidies for everyone using Other Peoples' Money.

I took a look at that Price-Waterhouse site, for venture capital. If you really want to see venture capital, look at California!

Seems to me, freedom has historically happened where there aren't huge numbers of people, lots of business going on. Somewhat marginal areas. Wherever large volumes of money start flowing, the government finds ways to tap into it. So the fact that NH is relatively free seems somewhat of an anomaly. Wyoming is the much more usual example of a (relatively) free place.

FSP is not a program to get neat jobs for 20,000 people. It is to get a state free. It is expected that some effort and inconvenience will be experienced to do so; among those things might be a career change or a cut in pay. Oh, well.

The only valid basis for arguing jobs is if:

1) Jobs are so bad we'd not get enough activists into Wyoming, such that it would be worse off than New Hampshire. That is a tough argument to make, since only 7500 activists in Wyoming match a full 20,000 in New Hampshire, when comparing the voting populations. And some large fraction, (a quarter, I think Jason said) of our people are retirees. That means 5000 of those 7500 won't even need jobs. There are 27,000 job openings in Wyoming roughly in the same period we intend to move to the state. There will be enough jobs for our activists in Wyoming, to surpass the activism we'd be able to manage in a large population state like New Hampshire.

2) Even though our activists have jobs, they might pay so little that the extra money they'd make in New Hampshire would more than compensate, by allowing that money to be donated to campaigns, other forms of activism, etc. However, that assumes our activists actually do spend that money on campaigns rather than a new boat  ::) and anyway, you have to spend more on campaigns there because the campaigns are a lot more expensive!

Income is higher in NH, looks like about 30% higher. About half of that is lost with the higher cost of living there, and the "progressive" federal income tax probably eats some of that advantage too.

I can't think of any other (besides the two above) valid basis for arguing jobs, between the two states, that bears on FSP as a project. Maybe someone else can think of one.

Again, FSP is not a jobs program. If you want a neat job, move to California. FSP is a project to make a state free, and we need to evaluate factors with that in mind. Venture capital is not terribly relevant toward freedom. I'd rather live in a state, for example, with a well-developed barter economy because the people all want to hide their income from the thieving federal government, even if it would not get Price-Waterhouse's stamp of approval.
« Last Edit: June 05, 2003, 01:51:02 am by Zxcv »
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New Hampshire vs. Wyoming – Self Defense Laws?
« Reply #87 on: June 05, 2003, 11:51:23 am »


Ok, now as we all know there is a brutal war between these two states for control of the FSP final destination.  The question I have in regards to the choice between the two states is this.

How does each state rate and compare toward each other in regards to self-defense laws?  How much liberty does each state grant toward preservation of life and property?  I know that some states like Texas will legally allow one to shoot in order to defend life and property, and such defenders rarely face prosecution for legit defense of said reasons.  On the other hand, there are states such as MA where if you shoot someone in self-defense, even if it’s to save your life, you will be in VERY, VERY deep legal trouble!  Killing in defense of property is definite no no.  

Now, I am totally unfamiliar with how WY and NH treat its citizens in this regard.  Do they have authority to protect their property with force?  Do self-defense shooters face prosecution?  Does one state fair better than the other in this regard?

This is a very pertinent question, and it is one that will help sway the choice of which state to support for many people.  I, as well as many others, eagerly await an answer from those of you in the know.    
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Re:New Hampshire vs. Wyoming – Self Defense Laws?
« Reply #88 on: June 05, 2003, 02:45:05 pm »

Now, now, I wouldn't call it a "brutal war"....... Reserve that for places like the former Yugoslavia...
I would call it a "friendly, active discussion of ideas and merits of the respective states".
I am going to a game Tuesday with a lawyer friend, I will ask him unless we figure it out otherwise before then...

JM
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Re:New Hampshire vs. Wyoming – Self Defense Laws?
« Reply #89 on: June 05, 2003, 03:30:27 pm »

Quote
How does each state rate and compare toward each other in regards to self-defense laws?  How much liberty does each state grant toward preservation of life and property?

New Hampshire Constitution
http://www.state.nh.us/constitution/billofrights.html
Art. 2-a. The Bearing of Arms. All persons have the right to keep and bear arms in defense of themselves, their families, their property and the state.

Wyoming Constitution
http://soswy.state.wy.us/informat/2003%20Constitution.pdf
Sec. 24. Right to bear arms. The right of citizens to bear arms in
defense of themselves and of the state shall not be denied.


This is all I could find on self-defense laws in NH and WY.  Either no explicit self-defense laws exist in either state or such information is extremely difficult to find.  I've been looking for hours!

WY's Constitution permits only the defense of yourself and the state.

On the other hand, NH's Constitution explicitly permits the defense of yourself, your family, your property, and the state.

I'm sure the actual laws and the enforcement of them are nearly identical in both states, but in NH the defense of property and family is an explicitly-stated right in the state Constitution, and this right is thus afforded greater protection against freedom-hating lawmakers.  LOL

Has anyone found any actual state self-defense laws in NH or WY outside of the states' Constitutions?
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