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Author Topic: Why are you a member of the FSP?  (Read 8234 times)

vermass

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Why are you a member of the FSP?
« on: February 14, 2003, 08:59:38 pm »

   There is a ton of data comparing all kinds of stuff throughout this site. I'd like to KNOW the FSPer's themselves.   What does the "Face of the FPS" look like? I know some people out there are somewhat anonymous and that's fine if you don't feel like revealing much of yourself. I'm not anonymous I'm a nurse with a CCW permit and I'm x-military, so my prints and all my personal stuff ain't that hard to find.  I'll start!
   I'm a  39 y/o white male born in MA where I also live now. I am a desert storm veteran and was active duty airborne infantry before that. I've lived in AK 2 1/2 years and have been out west though I've never lived there. I did spend a summer in TX. I've been to ME, NH and VT many times, I've also traveled overseas. I've been a nurse for 13 years now. My hobbies are working out, shooting. reading and I love my 100# Pit Bull. I'm twice divorced and have two wonderful sons.
     Born into a democratic family I had been a registered independent who allways voted repuplican. I became a libertarian only recently. It's was so ingrained in my head the way "Things are done" that I needed someone else show me an alternative way. I've recieved Reason magazine for about a year now. The book The Ballad Of Carl Drego made my conversion complete. There's a price to pay for this kind of enlightenment, it's called discontent. I was living with a girl (more on her in a minute) and we were developing a farm together. As I read about the USDA and alternative farming and this and that I became somewhat upset about the state of things. So here I am: Pro-freedom watching my second amendment rights get flushed down the toilet every day,  trying to start a small farm that we can make a living on, watching the 2002 elections where none of the viable candidates have any respect whatsoever for the rights of others, reading about libertarian ideas while reading about how much crap I'm going to have to go through so I can sell someone a gallon of pasteurized goats milk only to find out how much better for you unpasteurized milk is (but you can't sell unpasteurized milk. [Now I'm really not wanting to discuss the merits of pasteurized vs unpasteurized milk here just telling a story]) I'm thinking to myself while all this is going on "why can't all people who don't wnat these stupid regulations live somewhere together like there own state and just be left alone"? If I don't care if my neighbor on one side of me has an M-16 and on the other side of me doesn't wear his seat belt and smokes pot, than why the hell are they being forced to comply with some stupid law? They don't care about my unpasteurized goats milk. John say's nothing cures cottonmouth like a good glass of goats milk (I think not), Ringo say's it calms him down and he can "shoot better"    can you imagine such a society? If you're a FSP member I think that's excactly what you do imagine.
    Back to the girlfriend. She was mad at me to begin with for spending too much time on the computer. When I went to work she went onto this site and read some of my postings. She thinks the FSP is crazy. Not crazy like, it'll never work, but crazy like "get out of this house and stay away from my kids crazy".  Due to her response and the way she spoke to me (lack of respect) I didn't bother defending the FSP I simply packed. I have since sent her an E-mail telling her she needs to find out what she's talking about before she attacks people.
   So what I'm interested in is knowing what atracts people to the free state project. Who are my fellow FSPer's?
« Last Edit: February 14, 2003, 10:47:32 pm by vermass »
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MarkLiberty

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Re: Why are you a member of the FSP?
« Reply #1 on: February 14, 2003, 10:46:40 pm »

Damn thats a pretty rough story hehe. Sounds like you are pretty dedicated though. Do you prefer an Eastern state?

I am a 19 year old college freshman at UC Irvine in Southern California. I was originally born in Minnesota and lived in the Twin Cities for 10 years. Most of my family lives there, but my immediate family moved to San Diego when my dad got a new job. My whole family is very conservative, and I have always been into politics as a strong conservative. I liked a lot of libertarian ideas and was kind of upset at the fact that republicans always seem to want to cut government but never do so. Being a big sports fan, I was on the ESPN baseball message boards and meno71 from the Texas board posted a link to this site. I checked it out, and two days later I signed up. I think it would be the coolest thing to have a free state. I thought I would never want to leave SoCal, but if there is one thing thats worth leaving for its this. However, I'm going for Wyoming and the rest of the Western States first, but I wouldn't be too upset if we moved to an Eastern state just because of the proximity to big cities.
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vermass

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Re: Why are you a member of the FSP?
« Reply #2 on: February 15, 2003, 11:56:00 am »

  17 reads 1 reply? Ya Mark, I was all for VT, their lack of second amendment infringements got my vote. Now that I've been doing a great deal of browsing through this site I feel NH is the way to go. I live in MA as I said so I'd prefer not to move too far from relatives esp mom and dad (like many others). I think the job market just isn't there in WY. I do hope though that if it is a westrn state it's WY. I don't feel I'll have trouble getting a job due to the nationwide nursing shortage I'm just not sure others will be so fortunate.
   Same deal here with the republicans: they talk about cutting government and then spend and grow, spend and grow. Department of Homeland Security? They're also for "reasonable" gun control. They also like the Dems, regulate the hell out of our lives. If they were serious about freedom they wouldn't have passed the [ANTI] Patriot act.
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cathleeninsc

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Re: Why are you a member of the FSP?
« Reply #3 on: February 16, 2003, 10:09:18 am »

We all have our stories about seeing the light. Mine isn't so much when the lightbulb went off as the progression from my optmistic youth to realizing if something has to change, I have to do it. Here are some of the high points of that progression. In the 70's and early 80's, I lived in Ron Paul's district in Texas. You mean all Republican's aren't like him?!?! In the late 80's I was pressured at work to contribute to the PAC because "we need to protect our industry and careers". But then my money is going to some of the worst politicians. That kind of protection shames me. In the 90's, my son went to prison on a drug charge. Those federal agents used devious tactics and illegal ones under our state law. My pride in America no longer extends to those in power.

But here in the FSP, I see people of integrity and principles. I see the possbility of of a system where Americans stand and fall by their own merits, where people with ideas are encouraged and not stifled.

That's just a little bit of my story.
Cathleen in SC
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vermass

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Re: Why are you a member of the FSP?
« Reply #4 on: February 17, 2003, 12:11:24 pm »

   It seems the FEDS are involved in a lot of entrapment. Both the Ruby Ridge and Waco sieges were based on evidence gained by entrapment. Both cases were based on firearms law violations, firearm laws that are unconstitutional, go figure. When I think of all the people I know who are normal productive members of society that have violated anti-drug laws at some point in their life that would now be reduced to  wards of the state or ex-cons had they been caught.....Well our drug laws are just plain stupid. I say this as a nurse who did a lot of drugs as a youth but now doesn't smoke (anything!) and seldom even has a drink. Our drug laws are based on fiction. If anything supports terrorism, it's our DRUG LAWS not the consumers themselves. You could grow poppy down south and marijuana throughout the US. No, if drugs were legal I still wouldn't do them. Everyone acknowledges prohibition was a failure and contributed greatly to crime, when are they going to say the same about the "War On Dugs"?
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Non-Conformer

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Re: Why are you a member of the FSP?
« Reply #5 on: February 17, 2003, 03:15:14 pm »

This seems like an interesting topic, so I will put my 2 cents worth in.  8)

I'm 48, married, 3 kids, homeowner from Texas, computer geek by profession.  I first heard about the Libertarian party back in 1980 during the Ed Clark campaign.  I remember being deliriously thrilled hearing about the existance of a political group that actually stood for what I beleived in!  :D

But over the years, my excitement has yeilded to reality.  The cold hard fact is that the Libertarian Party has simply not had much impact in American politics.   :-[ Time to try another approach.

And then one day I read an article on LewRockwell.com by Jason Sorens.   The wheels in my head started to turn.  Could this actually work?   It sounds crazy, but, there's a chance, a remote chance, that the libertarians around the country just might pull this off.  I emailed Jason and told him to sign me up!  :D


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Lars H

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Re: Why are you a member of the FSP?
« Reply #6 on: February 18, 2003, 02:26:18 am »

I am a 34-year-old high-tech marketing/management type, currently between permanent jobs, and father of two.  

I've been a libertarian and a Libertarian for 23 years now.  My folks learned about the LP at (I believe) a Unitarian church hard by Spindletop in Texas, in the late 70s.  

We moved to Vermont soon thereafter, and I recall being at a Libertarian convention the year that Clark ran.  Chatted up some folks in the elevator and was scolded for proselytising at such a young age.   :D

I'm still a member of the LP, though I've been disappointed in particular with some of what Browne's done -- his comments immediately after 9-11 were ill-timed and ill-considered (regardless of the accuracy of his underlying analysis).  The strident note of some of their public comments have seemed to me to undermine their message as well.

I've not been seriously involved in the party for many years, though I (usually) vote the LP ticket, and often write in "NOTA" where there's no candidate.

Since Vermont, I've lived in California (one year of USAF tech school), Texas again for a while, Alaska, Vermont again, and now Oregon.  Work and travels have taken me to Idaho, Wyoming, Maine and New Hampshire for reasonably extended stays, and I've been through South Dakota and Montana.  I believe that I passed through Delaware at one point or another, but I couldn't swear to it.  

So I've been to all but one or two of the candidate states, and have pretty good firsthand knowledge of about half of them.

My wife found the FSP through a homeschool list that she participates in.  The resident libertarian there had been told to go find someplace where he and the rest of the "crackpots" could build their perfect society.  (Strangely enough, the homeschool community seems to be infested with flaming liberals... go figure.)  Anyhow, he found the FSP, posted a message about it, and here we are.

My wife and I talked it over and gave it a good long period of serious thought, resisting the urge to join immediately.  Talked it over with my folks, and even dragged them to a local FSP meeting when they came out on vacation.

My wife and I signed up a couple of months ago, and we're gearing up to start participating in the political machinations here, so that we have some experience as activists under our belts when we arrive in the Free State.

We're both very excited about the prospects of the FSP.  It brings a measure of hope to us, as well as the excitement of contributing in a meaningful way to the cause of freedom.
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SandyPrice

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Re: Why are you a member of the FSP?
« Reply #7 on: February 18, 2003, 08:58:55 am »

I'm probably one of the two senior members here.  I was born in 1933 in California to a bunch of totally free patriot Americans.  I was exactly the right age during WW2 to l earn about America and why we entered the war and why we would (and did) win it!

The whole family was Republican and proud of the contributions that party had brought to California and America.  All the men in my family had served in one war or another and we never gave it a second thought.

The basis for my generation's contributions to the cause of freedom came directly from the family and schools in our district.  All my teachers were Democrats but all were dedicated Americans and gave us all a good background in our founding fathers and the constitution.

That right there is what is missing today.  Sometime in the sixties there appeared in our Universities a terrible hatred for American freedoms and the consequences of this movement has caused too many Americans to look to the federal government for their problem solving.  

We tried very hard to control this movement by locating, backing and campaigning for Barry Goldwater who ran as a political conservative.  What we didn't realize was the involvement of many European bankers who had other plans for America.  The Republican National Committee refused to get behind Goldwater, having chosen Rockefeller as their candidate, and Goldwater never had a chance.  The Conservative movement was born and died in 1964.

I now was married with 2 little girls of my own and a step son.  Being very political, we could see where our freedoms were heading down the drain and our single attempt to correct it was a total failure.  What could we do?

We discovered the writings and philosophy of Ayn Rand and the problem cleared up!  The seed of simply walking away from the intrusive government being developed by LBJ and deciding not to continue to pay the income taxes and social security retirement programs  became our focus.  

The Liberty Amendment was formed to repeal the 16th Amendment and became our attempt to stop the growth of the federal government by stopping the continued input of money feeding it.  We failed twice!  It soon became apparent the American people wanted this kind of control and they could stop thinking for themselves and let Big Daddy do it for them.

From this attempt came the Libertarian Party.  It was too late and generations of Americans lost all interest in maintaining their freedoms and sadly even Ayn Rand's philosophy was taught as a cult, an anti-religious cult.

When my kids entered the University of California system, Socialism became the political movement of choice.  But I had played a dirty trick and had exposed my kids to Objectivism and the books of Rand.  Bingo!  

Free thinking Americans cannot be manipulated into any Socialistic programs and was obviously the answer to the training of our children.  I pulled my kids out of Christian schools to prepare them for thinking for themselves and never accepting the words of other for their direction.  Using Rand's tenets my kids learned to analyze every decision they would have to make and knowing instinctively right from wrong, brought them through the years of Berkeley teachers.  I had a wonderful time watching them cut through the crap of socialism and end up wonderful and rational adults.

In the back of my mind was this Utopia of Atlas Shrugged and I pretty well designed my own.  We bought an old cabin on a mountain top where our values came from the earth and included all the wonderful words of our founding fathers.  It was so simple that I'm surprised more people didn't do it.  NO TELEVISION in our home!  NO INFLUENCE  from any government school.  My kids were not loners or social misfits because they attended wonderful schools and our home became the fun place for their friends to gather.  Horses, farm animals including a rooster with an attitude who was the character of the area.  Dogs,  cats and every possible pet known to man.

Earthquakes, floods and forest fires taught us all the survival tricks that always brought us through.  But still the dream of the Galt mountain was always there.

I too read an article by Jason Sorens somewhere and my old ears pricked up with interest.  I cannot move with the group for several reasons.  I am handicapped with arthritic knees that surgery has only made worse.  So I will stay in the Arizona desert!  

Also my life without television has addicted me to live classical music of the worst sort.  I managed my own chamber music group for years in California and was drawn to his desert oasis because of their Chamber music organization.  I am addicted and require many live concerts for my own enjoyment.  

I do talk about the FSP constantly and introduce the concept to many people who share my desire for a less intrusive and affordable federal government.  Even at 70, I can see no reason for the federal government to set my moral standards for me.  I find the entire Bush Conservative movement to be a total fraud.  

He is building a Christian police state and I will fight it until my last days.  I don't know where America will end up because we may be too late to stop any of the movements from the left or the right.  I will continue to search out an Independent Party that will carve away all this stuff being thrown at us from both parties and let the Constitution speak for us again.  

I saw it work years ago and we must educate the people of America to start learning about our freedoms and strive to keep them.  I'm looking at the young people of the FSP to furnish leaders who can restore our liberties; return America to a secular nation and make our sovereignty the focus for the future.  

I will stay in close contact with the group and hope that someday a group will form in our own community in the desert.  I will continue to be your cheer leader!!

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vermass

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Re: Why are you a member of the FSP?
« Reply #8 on: February 18, 2003, 01:25:02 pm »

      I had misstakenly started this topic under "Which State?". I had asked Jason to move it. I'm glad to get responses. I've recently moved back in with my folks and am banking lots of monet for mt FSP move. I've cut my social life to work and this computer for now. I will be atending the NH get together this summer.
     SandyPrice sorry to see you won't be moving to the Free State Project after all these years, it seems that you've paid your dues for the LP that's for sure! Moses not being able to see the "Promised Land" comes to mind. Hopefully if you can't move there you'll at least get to visit.
      Lars H, check this out. You pull your kids out of school for the same reasons they do in a way. The ultra-liberals figure the public schools are "programing" kids to follow the current trend in thinking (which the schools are of course doing) and they don't want their kids to grow up with that set of values. They want them EVEN MORE LIBERAL. They want to raise little socialist. So while people pull their kids OUT for basically the same reasons, what they do when they have them out differs significantly! We want to raise free thinking people, they want to raise paraniod snob busy-bodies. That's how liberals get votes: the scare the heck out of people making them believe that in a free world they'd be too stupid to take care of themselve, that they'd be taken advantage of.  They have the help of the puplic school sytem in doing this. How do you explain the American Revolutionary War without being able to say the word GUN in school?
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Ceol Mhor

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Re: Why are you a member of the FSP?
« Reply #9 on: February 21, 2003, 08:20:50 pm »

I'm a 19-year-old sophomore at Purdue University majoring in aeronautical engineering and minoring in history.

I've been a libertarian for about 4 years, exactly as long as I've been interested in politics. During the summer I turned 16, I got my first job and my first rifle (a .22). In other words, I got simultaneous firsthand introductions to gun control (gun show dealers telling me it was illegal for me to examine rifles until I was 18) and income tax (with a nice ol' 25% of my first paycheck withheld). Politics suddenly went from being something boring radio commentators argued over to being a system with a lot of control over my life. I started educating myself about the system and the parties, and surprised my parents by registering to vote as a Libertarian on the day after my 18th birthday. My interest was for a while confined mostly to gun laws, but since I began college it has expanded to include almost all areas of the freedom movement. A turning point for me was a prize I won from the Liberty Round Table in their 2001 essay contest - getting to know some of the LRTers has really broadened my horizons, and encouraged me to take a more active role in working for a freer world.

I found the Free State Project about 6 months ago. After reading through the web site, I took a few days to deliberate and then joined. I don't think that libertarianism can gain broad support until there is a working, tangible example of it to show people. More importantly, I don't want to live in a socialistic bureaucracy! While my preference would be towards a Western state, I will gladly move anywhere the FSP goes, even if it means flipping burgers for a living. Freedom is my goal.

Ian
« Last Edit: February 21, 2003, 08:24:12 pm by Ceol Mhor »
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vermass

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Re: Why are you a member of the FSP?
« Reply #10 on: February 21, 2003, 09:32:09 pm »

   Hi Ceol Mhor, they say there's two things we're "not supposed to talk about" on a first date or at work or at the dinner table, religion and politics. Why do you think that is? They're the only two things that really matter. Now, I'm not a religious person but isn't that important in itself? Ya, the two most important things in life, things that actually relate to ones character, we don't talk about, it's impolite. We talk about stupid things things that matter little. Everyones introduction to politics is their first mugging by the government. That first paycheck is an rude awakening. You ask what the &*$# is going on here and you're told "everyones got to pay their dues", so most of us (them not us) just shut up and put up. I'm moving to the chosen state in the spring of 2005.
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phylinidaho

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Re: Why are you a member of the FSP?
« Reply #11 on: February 22, 2003, 09:43:03 am »

I'm probably one of the two senior members here.  
and I am the other. I was born in 1929 in Florida. My family moved back to my mother's home state of Oregon before I reached the age of two. My parents did not vote - my mother said it was because they would cancel each other out. She was Republican, he was Democrat. (I learned later that they were not citizens. My dad was a British subject from the Bahamas and my mother lost her citizenship under the law at the time they were married). I believe they were in reality libertarians, although they had never heard the word. I was one of four children, who were raised to think for themselves, and to pursue their individual goals.
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 I was exactly the right age during WW2 to l earn about America and why we entered the war and why we would (and did) win it!
Here again, our stories are similar. But the rest is almost opposite. In a sense, I have lived my life backward. My childhood was marred by medical problems. I grew up believing that my lack of energy was a product of my mother's over-protection, since doctors had said that I had only a minor heart problem. Although I did earn a degree in Law, with my parents' encouragement, I lacked the energy to pursue both a career and marriage. Since I wanted children, I chose marriage. When I was 62, a doctor finally discovered that my birth defect was not minor, but consisted of a large hole in the heart - which was surgically corrected in 1991. The result is that, even at age 74, I have more energy now than I had as a child.  I am still experimenting to learn my physical limitations (now complicated  by the approach of old age). But I am confident that I can contribute my share to the Free State Project for at least ten years. I want to make my life count for something.

As to how I found FSP - I have already mentioned that my parents had libertarian ideas. (Of course, in the 40s the schools were not working against them quite so much, although I think the "dumbing-down" was in full swing. I base this on the fact that my frequent month-long absences from school did not put me behind the class.) Having so little energy and a husband (ex- since 1975) who would rather complain about loss of freedom than do anything about it, my involvement in politics was limited to voting for the lesser of two evils.

I first heard of the Libertarian party during the 1996 election campaign. I voted Libertarian that year and at every election since. I joined the party in 2000 - after gaining internet access and reading the official website. I first heard of FSP in the fall of 2001, through the IDLP, but dismissed it as just another hair-brained scheme, without taking a look. Then, in the spring of 2002, I decided to take a look at the website. It looked too good to be true, so I entered the email group and asked a few questions. Having received satisfactory answers from Jason, I decided to join, and here I am.

Having lived my entire life in Oregon, Washington and Idaho, I naturally favor the West. It's hard for me to believe that freedom-loving individuals can thrive close to the major cities of the NorthEast. I will move to the NorthEast if that is the choice, but not as early as I will move if a Western state other than Idaho - my current home -  is chosen. (I'm talking about moving before the 20,000 figure is reached).

 
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vermass

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Re: Why are you a member of the FSP?
« Reply #12 on: February 22, 2003, 10:28:08 am »

   Some story. As a nurse I can apprciate the medical aspect of it. I too will move early, I figure spring of '05.
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