Free State Project Forum

New Hampshire -- The "Live Free or Die" State => Education/ Homeschooling => Topic started by: LoveFreedomAndLiberty on October 04, 2011, 10:56:34 pm

Title: Homeschool-University
Post by: LoveFreedomAndLiberty on October 04, 2011, 10:56:34 pm
Does anyone know of any affordable, legitimate university/college level homeschool programs?  Is there a test at the end of the program so that the student has a legitimate degree to show employers?
Title: Re: Homeschool-University
Post by: John Edward Mercier on October 04, 2011, 11:04:55 pm
Should be several on-line programs that are legit.
Title: Re: Homeschool-University
Post by: LoveFreedomAndLiberty on October 05, 2011, 12:53:06 pm
So, homeschooling does go beyond K-12?

What is the average cost to homeschool a K-12 child, and what is the cost to homeschool a university level student?

There are some places that offer onlines degrees, but that is not what I am talking about as the $37,000 (appx.) price tag for an online education still makes higher education out of budget for some families.  Some families/individuals might not want the extra debt/loans.

Also, some families might not want to fill out the applications that ask questions like "How many people live in your household?" "What high school did you go?" and so on.  Some people may just want an education without the many questions, and/or personal information required on some applications or finacial aid paperwork.  Some families may value privacy but still want an education.  So, homeschooling might be better for privacy and financial reasons for some people.  Just an opinion.

I am just curious if homeschooling exists for higher education?  Anyone know of any specific providers?  Are the degrees respected by employers?
Title: Re: Homeschool-University
Post by: Toowm on October 09, 2011, 05:40:37 pm
The Gary North system would serve as a good way to homeschool college with an accredited degree as proof.
Title: Re: Homeschool-University
Post by: Toowm on October 09, 2011, 05:42:09 pm
Found this as a general caution for those that seek to change education through start-ups:

http://avichal.wordpress.com/2011/10/07/why-education-startups-do-not-succeed/
Title: Re: Homeschool-University
Post by: Jacobus on October 20, 2011, 11:40:37 am
Try MIT's Open Courseware:

http://ocw.mit.edu/index.htm
Title: Re: Homeschool-University
Post by: oddonesout on November 26, 2011, 11:29:16 am
Blake Boles, author of College Without High School, and founder of Unschool Adventures, has created Zero Tuition College.  http://www.ztcollege.com/   My kids are a little too young for it right now but it seems pretty awesome.    Jessica
Title: Re: Homeschool-University
Post by: Alex Libman on November 27, 2011, 12:05:30 am
MIT OpenCourseWare (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MIT_OpenCourseWare) is great, and lots of universities are following in its footsteps.  This week's foremost example:

From Slashdot -- Stanford's Free Computer Science Courses (http://news.slashdot.org/story/11/11/23/2159216/stanfords-free-computer-science-courses) --

Quote
Stanford University (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stanford_University) is offering the online world more of its undergraduate level CS courses (http://www.i-programmer.info/news/150-training-a-education/3361-stanfords-free-computer-science-courses.html).  These free courses consist of YouTube videos with computer-marked quizzes and programming assignments.  The ball had been started rolling by Sebastian Thrun (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sebastian_Thrun) and Peter Norvig (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Norvig)'s free online version of their Stanford AI class (http://developers.slashdot.org/story/11/08/04/1646210/Stanford-Intro-To-AI-Course-Offered-Free-Online), for which they hoped to reach an audience in the order of a hundred thousand, a target which they seem to have achieved.

As well as the previously announced Machine learning course (http://news.slashdot.org/story/11/08/21/1820240/more-stanford-computing-courses-go-free), you can now sign up to any of:  Computer Science 101 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_scientist), Software as a Service (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Software_as_a_service), Human-Computer Interaction (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human–computer_interaction), Natural Language Processing (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Natural_language_processing), Game Theory (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Game_theory), Probabilistic  (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Statistical_model)Graphical Models (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Graphical_model), Cryptography and Design (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Outline_of_cryptography), and Analysis of Algorithms (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Analysis_of_algorithms).  Almost a complete computer science course and they are adding more.  Introductory videos and details are available from each courses website.

There are lots of others (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Educational_websites).  The Khan Academy (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Khan_Academy) starts at the beginning, but some of their videos [BT] (http://btjunkie.org/torrent/Khan-Academy-khanacademy-COMPLETE-2011-08-09/4358a6cabef29b208d6c79573f5ff78d291a34d10c59) could be considered college-level.

I think we're already passed the point where you can get an excellent college-equivalent education online for free, at least in the most common study areas.  If not now, then soon for sure.  What's needed is more certification programs that can objectively verify people's knowledge and ability without making them jump through hoops the way colleges do...
Title: Re: Homeschool-University
Post by: LoveFreedomAndLiberty on January 28, 2012, 09:58:00 pm
Thank you for the great links and info. 
Title: Re: Homeschool-University
Post by: escapist_reborn on March 04, 2012, 10:48:55 pm
I'll have to chime in and mention my school, George Wythe University. They are an excellent small school in Utah, and I completed my four-year degree there, spending only one (by choice) on-campus. I would recommend them above any other university in the world, especially for libertarians and others who march to the beat of a different drummer:

http://www.gw.edu/
Title: Re: Homeschool-University
Post by: LoveFreedomAndLiberty on March 24, 2012, 02:57:37 pm
Thought this topic might be helpful too:

https://www.freetalklive.com/content/unschool_yourself_and_your_kids
Title: Re: Homeschool-University
Post by: powerline87 on March 24, 2012, 08:57:46 pm
If you decide to homeschool your kids, they should learn the official stuff probably from the books used by public schools, but they should learn their REAL economics starting in what would be like 6th grade with Peter Schiff's book, "How an Economy Grows and Why It Crashes," then moving on to Henry Hazlitt's "Economics in One Lesson," for a full understanding of the basics, then moving on to things, if they really care, like Ron Paul's "End the Fed," the History of Economic Thought books by Murray Rothbard, and maybe even Ludwig von Mises's "The theory of Money and Credit," which I only recommend (and I haven't even finished it yet), to someone who is really interested in it and has a LOT of free time.  Get the rest of your econ material from Tom Woods and mises.org

Also, have them read the "Politically Incorrect Guide to History," by Tom Woods at what would be like 8th grade.  Then, a book I'm going to start reading at some point, and what I heard is really good and in-depth for US Colonial History, is Murray Rothbard's "Conceived in Liberty," which is around 1600 pages long.

I am NOT a teacher (although people have told me a should have been... I do tend to over-explain stuff sometimes.), but these books were interesting and informative for me.

I never learned Latin, but I look it up, and apparently the easiest way to learn Latin is with a book called "LINGVA LATINA", which I started reading, but then got to busy with other stuff to continue reading.  You have to schedule out time every day to learn if you want to, and I don't really make schedules for myself, so, that never really took off, but I have learned a little bit of Latin, not enough for a conversation yet, but the book seems to be good, as it teaches through Immersion (all the sentences are Latin, you have to figure out what they mean while you read it based off the pictures and the context in the sentences).

Math and Physics would be easier for me because they're actually related to my major, but I'ld look for textbooks used in a public school's AP (Advanced Placement) math and science classes, and base your material off of that.

Title: Re: Homeschool-University
Post by: EricMasters on April 16, 2012, 03:51:05 pm
I'll have to chime in and mention my school, George Wythe University. They are an excellent small school in Utah, and I completed my four-year degree there, spending only one (by choice) on-campus. I would recommend them above any other university in the world, especially for libertarians and others who march to the beat of a different drummer:

http://www.gw.edu/

While I'm sure this is a fine institution, I believe it's fair for everyone to be aware of this which I got off of the school's website:

"At present, George Wythe University is not accredited by a regional or national accrediting agency. GWU is currently pursuing accreditation of its on-campus undergraduate program, and fully intends to accredit all programs as soon as possible thereafter. Meanwhile, our alumni still regularly gain admittance to law school and other graduate programs."

Title: Re: Homeschool-University
Post by: escapist_reborn on April 16, 2012, 04:48:02 pm
I'll have to chime in and mention my school, George Wythe University. They are an excellent small school in Utah, and I completed my four-year degree there, spending only one (by choice) on-campus. I would recommend them above any other university in the world, especially for libertarians and others who march to the beat of a different drummer:

http://www.gw.edu/

While I'm sure this is a fine institution, I believe it's fair for everyone to be aware of this which I got off of the school's website:

"At present, George Wythe University is not accredited by a regional or national accrediting agency. GWU is currently pursuing accreditation of its on-campus undergraduate program, and fully intends to accredit all programs as soon as possible thereafter. Meanwhile, our alumni still regularly gain admittance to law school and other graduate programs."



While I'm sure the non-accreditation concern can be a valid one, I believe it's fair for everyone to be aware that my unaccredited degree still got me into the White House. I've never had problems because of it... quite to the contrary, in fact.
Title: Re: Homeschool-University
Post by: maxxoccupancy on April 16, 2012, 06:17:55 pm
Liberal arts colleges don't need accreditation.  This was one of the reasons that some of use have been looking into setting up an actual liberal arts college for liberty bound porcs.  The idea being that students graduating from high school could make the move now and actually live in the Granite State while pursuing a degree.  If techical courses are your deal, science/computer/engineering type courses could serve as the "electives," and possibly even a "minor."
Title: Re: Homeschool-University
Post by: EricMasters on April 17, 2012, 10:35:37 am
I'll have to chime in and mention my school, George Wythe University. They are an excellent small school in Utah, and I completed my four-year degree there, spending only one (by choice) on-campus. I would recommend them above any other university in the world, especially for libertarians and others who march to the beat of a different drummer:

http://www.gw.edu/

While I'm sure this is a fine institution, I believe it's fair for everyone to be aware of this which I got off of the school's website:

"At present, George Wythe University is not accredited by a regional or national accrediting agency. GWU is currently pursuing accreditation of its on-campus undergraduate program, and fully intends to accredit all programs as soon as possible thereafter. Meanwhile, our alumni still regularly gain admittance to law school and other graduate programs."



While I'm sure the non-accreditation concern can be a valid one, I believe it's fair for everyone to be aware that my unaccredited degree still got me into the White House. I've never had problems because of it... quite to the contrary, in fact.

Interesting. What is it you do/did in the White House?
Title: Re: Homeschool-University
Post by: EricMasters on April 17, 2012, 10:37:05 am
Liberal arts colleges don't need accreditation.  This was one of the reasons that some of use have been looking into setting up an actual liberal arts college for liberty bound porcs.  The idea being that students graduating from high school could make the move now and actually live in the Granite State while pursuing a degree.  If techical courses are your deal, science/computer/engineering type courses could serve as the "electives," and possibly even a "minor."

Are students with degrees from unaccredited Lib Arts colleges are employed or accepted to Professional degrees just as often as students from accredited universities?
Title: Re: Homeschool-University
Post by: escapist_reborn on April 18, 2012, 02:29:13 am
I'll have to chime in and mention my school, George Wythe University. They are an excellent small school in Utah, and I completed my four-year degree there, spending only one (by choice) on-campus. I would recommend them above any other university in the world, especially for libertarians and others who march to the beat of a different drummer:

http://www.gw.edu/

While I'm sure this is a fine institution, I believe it's fair for everyone to be aware of this which I got off of the school's website:

"At present, George Wythe University is not accredited by a regional or national accrediting agency. GWU is currently pursuing accreditation of its on-campus undergraduate program, and fully intends to accredit all programs as soon as possible thereafter. Meanwhile, our alumni still regularly gain admittance to law school and other graduate programs."



While I'm sure the non-accreditation concern can be a valid one, I believe it's fair for everyone to be aware that my unaccredited degree still got me into the White House. I've never had problems because of it... quite to the contrary, in fact.

Interesting. What is it you do/did in the White House?

I interned at the Office of Public Liaison, the Administration's main PR office, back in '08 under Bush.

Liberal arts colleges don't need accreditation.  This was one of the reasons that some of use have been looking into setting up an actual liberal arts college for liberty bound porcs.  The idea being that students graduating from high school could make the move now and actually live in the Granite State while pursuing a degree.  If techical courses are your deal, science/computer/engineering type courses could serve as the "electives," and possibly even a "minor."

Are students with degrees from unaccredited Lib Arts colleges are employed or accepted to Professional degrees just as often as students from accredited universities?

I've rarely seen accreditation as a problem when it comes to employment. Sometimes they ask when it comes to certain establishment educational programs, but you can always just apply anyway, and they usually won't care about the technicality if it's apparent that you're worth your stuff. I got into a summer program at Princeton, and it doesn't get more "establishment" than that.
Title: Re: Homeschool-University
Post by: EricMasters on April 19, 2012, 10:48:54 am
I'll have to chime in and mention my school, George Wythe University. They are an excellent small school in Utah, and I completed my four-year degree there, spending only one (by choice) on-campus. I would recommend them above any other university in the world, especially for libertarians and others who march to the beat of a different drummer:

http://www.gw.edu/

While I'm sure this is a fine institution, I believe it's fair for everyone to be aware of this which I got off of the school's website:

"At present, George Wythe University is not accredited by a regional or national accrediting agency. GWU is currently pursuing accreditation of its on-campus undergraduate program, and fully intends to accredit all programs as soon as possible thereafter. Meanwhile, our alumni still regularly gain admittance to law school and other graduate programs."



While I'm sure the non-accreditation concern can be a valid one, I believe it's fair for everyone to be aware that my unaccredited degree still got me into the White House. I've never had problems because of it... quite to the contrary, in fact.

Interesting. What is it you do/did in the White House?

I interned at the Office of Public Liaison, the Administration's main PR office, back in '08 under Bush.

Liberal arts colleges don't need accreditation.  This was one of the reasons that some of use have been looking into setting up an actual liberal arts college for liberty bound porcs.  The idea being that students graduating from high school could make the move now and actually live in the Granite State while pursuing a degree.  If techical courses are your deal, science/computer/engineering type courses could serve as the "electives," and possibly even a "minor."

Are students with degrees from unaccredited Lib Arts colleges are employed or accepted to Professional degrees just as often as students from accredited universities?

I've rarely seen accreditation as a problem when it comes to employment. Sometimes they ask when it comes to certain establishment educational programs, but you can always just apply anyway, and they usually won't care about the technicality if it's apparent that you're worth your stuff. I got into a summer program at Princeton, and it doesn't get more "establishment" than that.

Interesting, good to know escapist.
Title: Re: Homeschool-University
Post by: LoveFreedomAndLiberty on August 16, 2012, 04:51:25 pm
I wonder if there is a demand for AFFORDABLE Homeschool education for college level students?
Title: Re: Homeschool-University
Post by: John Edward Mercier on August 16, 2012, 06:27:18 pm
Should be. Internet-based education seems to be catching on for college level students.
Title: Re: Homeschool-University
Post by: LoveFreedomAndLiberty on August 17, 2012, 04:01:37 am
It does seem to be.  Now, if it could just be affordable.  Seems not having a campus to maintain cuts costs.  Also, if professors recorded classes and just received some kind of payment every time their video is watched, seems like a good way to cut costs too.  I would really like to see $100 classes (that includes books, etc.). in the very near future.  I think educating one's self should be highly encouraged.  Placing $50,000 price tags on education seems like a way to discourage some people from learning (other than what they can do on their own).
Title: Re: Homeschool-University
Post by: John Edward Mercier on August 17, 2012, 01:48:38 pm
Since the 'costs' that you associating in your post include profit; more competition should drive that down over time.
Title: Re: Homeschool-University
Post by: LoveFreedomAndLiberty on November 01, 2012, 05:20:30 pm
I thought this was interesting:

 http://www.mcclatchydc.com/2012/10/30/173100/lower-costs-lure-us-college-students.html#dsq-form-area

I have also heard that some students are choosing to educate themselves in Australia since their universities may be more affordable.  Also, Australia does not require students to take classes the student has no interest in to earn a degree (example: Math majors only have to take Math classes to earn a Math degree). A student gets to take classes that interest them.  

Meanwhile, in the USA, a Math major may be required to take classes like English Lit or Art Appreciation to earn a Math degree, and the Math major has to pay for those classes and sit through them..... or no degree....regardless of their brilliance in Math.  

Also, if some students go through school but never learn to read, doesn't that show that maybe the one system in the USA isn't working for every person?  If one system isn't the answer for everyone, why aren't there more systems to choose from; why don't students in the USA have choices at every level, K-12 and college?  This would allow a college student to choose a university that was affordable, and allow a Math major to choose a university that only required Math classes to earn a Math degree.

Other good articles on education:

 http://feltd.wordpress.com/2010/09/16/the-prussian-german-educational-system/

 http://www.fff.org/freedom/0795n.asp
 

Title: Re: Homeschool-University
Post by: Sarasyn on December 07, 2012, 03:04:22 pm
Is it having an accredited degree what's important?  Or are you looking for something that will give a homeschooler the education they need in order to obtain a job in their preferred field of study?  Not all fields require a degree or certification in order to get a job.  Sometimes building a reputation with peers that hold some kind of influence in the community can be enough to secure a position.  After all, which is more valuable, actual experience or a degree that says you have the knowledge.

If you're going the direction of a degree, I can't help you much, but if you want to go the route of experience, there I can help you.

ZTC (Zero Tuition College) is an organization dedicated to helping students attain actual life experience and peer references from the community that would equate to or be better than a degree.  This is done through life experience, mentoring, and things along that track.  Most of it is independent work that a student undertakes themselves.  It's still a very new program, but they could use all the support they could get from people who are willing to mentor other students, as well as building their student base.  Even if you decide not to go that way, it's a good place to meet self-directed learners and help other self-directed learners on their way.

http://www.ztcollege.com/

Enjoy!
Title: Re: Homeschool-University
Post by: maxxoccupancy on February 10, 2013, 10:20:39 pm
Take a look at the free online classes offered at edx.org.  Harvard, MIT, Stanford, Berkley, and other colleges allow students to take courses online, though you only get a certificate.