Free State Project Forum

New Hampshire -- The "Live Free or Die" State => Education/ Homeschooling => Topic started by: rossby on February 09, 2010, 06:32:50 pm

Title: A Private Pro-Liberty School in New Hampshire?
Post by: rossby on February 09, 2010, 06:32:50 pm
Well, let's hear it!
Title: Re: A Private Pro-Liberty School in New Hampshire?
Post by: Dreepa on February 09, 2010, 08:20:11 pm
nope not enough critical mass.
Title: Re: A Private Pro-Liberty School in New Hampshire?
Post by: rossby on February 09, 2010, 09:06:59 pm
Not enough critical mass within the U.S.? How terribly sad...
Title: Re: A Private Pro-Liberty School in New Hampshire?
Post by: MengerFan on February 09, 2010, 09:41:26 pm
We are evolving beyond the need for schools, and the liberty-minded will pioneer the way.
Title: Re: A Private Pro-Liberty School in New Hampshire?
Post by: rossby on February 09, 2010, 09:47:04 pm
We are evolving beyond the need for schools, and the liberty-minded will pioneer the way.

Don't think of a state university as template. If it were truly pro-liberty, I imagine it would be flexible and have actual ties to commerce and, uh, more connected to "real life". But I'm not really suggesting form or the extent of operations. Just posing a question.
Title: Re: A Private Pro-Liberty School in New Hampshire?
Post by: Dreepa on February 10, 2010, 06:05:29 pm
Not enough critical mass within the U.S.? How terribly sad...

In NH.
Title: Re: A Private Pro-Liberty School in New Hampshire?
Post by: Toowm on February 11, 2010, 12:53:45 am
We are evolving beyond the need for schools, and the liberty-minded will pioneer the way.
Don't think of a state university as template. If it were truly pro-liberty, I imagine it would be flexible and have actual ties to commerce and, uh, more connected to "real life". But I'm not really suggesting form or the extent of operations. Just posing a question.

private - yes
pro-liberty - no (or at least not as a focus)
post-secondary - maybe, although allowing younger people would make for more options (for example a high school AP-level science course with labs)
school (college, university, etc.)  - no, bricks and mortar aren't the way to go. Consider more of a Craig's List for hooking up instructors with students. Build up the network first before committing capital.
Title: Re: A Private Pro-Liberty School in New Hampshire?
Post by: Luck on February 25, 2010, 12:57:35 pm
I'll be discussing this on the Friendly Forum shortly. I have an idea similar to both of yours and I hope to start on the project soon.
Title: Starting Liberty College in NH
Post by: Luck on February 25, 2010, 01:01:50 pm
* I want to start a college in Manchester asap to teach how to achieve Liberty. I want to teach Libertarianism, U.S. & world history, politics, history of religion, mythology, philosophy, relationships, health, self-defense, science, tech etc.
* It might be called Liberty College. Needs for the college are:
1. cheap space for classrooms
2. partners to help organize
3. teachers
4. students
* I also want it to use the internet quite a bit in order to collaborate nationwide and worldwide, including using video sites like Youtube.
* Comments, questions?
Title: Re: Starting Liberty College in NH
Post by: Uncle Walt on February 25, 2010, 01:12:07 pm
Ummmmm ... why not offer the "libertarian" classes at the Manchester community college?

I know most community colleges out here, anybody can offer to teach/lecture courses they don't believe are met by the college's regular curriculum.  IE; hobbies, self-defense, etc.

That way, you don't have to compete for students for classes that are already offered by a local college. (IE; science, tech, history, etc)

Of course, if you want your courses "accredited", that's another matter.
Title: Re: A Private Pro-Liberty School in New Hampshire?
Post by: Floridian on February 25, 2010, 04:34:21 pm
Yes.  There is always a market for any product or service that provides sufficient value to the individual who purchases it.  The focus needs to be on the practical value of the education and what can be achieved by obtaining it.  Anyone trying to put together such an institution needs to hyperfocus on providing useful skills and experiences.

There is a very successful 8,000-student university here in Orlando that started very small in a modest old office building 30 years ago.  It is called Full Sail. www.fullsail.edu They do a great job of preparing students for careers in entertainment media.  I haven't been involved with Full Sail, but it seems to be an innovative combination of a trade school and a college.  This might be a good model or starting point for envisioning a pro-liberty school.
Title: Re: Starting Liberty College in NH
Post by: creaganlios on February 25, 2010, 06:40:01 pm
* I want to start a college in Manchester asap to teach how to achieve Liberty. I want to teach Libertarianism, U.S. & world history, politics, history of religion, mythology, philosophy, relationships, health, self-defense, science, tech etc.

1) Why?
2) Who do you expect your customers to be?
3) Do you hope to offer courses, degrees, or accredited degrees, and in what?
4) What will a graduate have as a result of purchasing this education?
5) Why should a student enroll in your school, rather than any other?  What is your competitive edge, your product differentiation, your 'special sauce?'

Understand that I am not opposed to what you may want to do....as the Chair of a College Business Department, who has taught in two colleges, I am intrigued and might even be interested.  But as such, I need to see a real vision and not a fly-by-night, hey lets=talk-about-freedom-and-call-it-college stuff.

Title: Re: A Private Pro-Liberty School in New Hampshire?
Post by: creaganlios on February 25, 2010, 06:41:59 pm
There seems to be two different threads addressing this same issue...is there some way to merge them?
Title: Re: A Private Pro-Liberty School in New Hampshire?
Post by: creaganlios on February 25, 2010, 06:44:11 pm
Why not just convinve George Mason or Hillsdale to open up a satellite campus here?
Title: Re: A Private Pro-Liberty School in New Hampshire?
Post by: freedomroad on February 25, 2010, 06:45:28 pm
There seems to be two different threads addressing this same issue...is there some way to merge them?

Good idea.  Done.
Title: Liberty College
Post by: Luck on February 25, 2010, 10:32:53 pm
* I was wondering where my thread went. They tend to disappear lately.
* I think I'll ask the anarchists to help get the college started first. I don't have much of a profit motive myself and I don't plan to emphasize that. I think it needs to emphasize achieving liberty. I don't think the U.S. founders had much of a profit motive, but they had great success, despite things not going perfectly most of the time, since their first successes.
* I'm thinking the college can evolve out of an offshoot from Taproom Tuesdays. How's that for a plan?
Title: Re: Starting Liberty College in NH
Post by: rossby on February 26, 2010, 07:33:49 pm
* I want to start a college in Manchester asap to teach how to achieve Liberty. I want to teach Libertarianism, U.S. & world history, politics, history of religion, mythology, philosophy, relationships, health, self-defense, science, tech etc.

1) Why?

Not directed at me, but...

Currently, there is a lack of social institutions. If we expect things to persist and grow, we must create those institutions. I'm not suggesting teaching a "libertarian" curriculum. I'm talking about a libertarian environment.

For example, Liberty University (not to to be confused with libertary as in libertarianism). All joking aside, they at least understand that to remain relevant, you must exert effort to build reliable and credible social institutions. Libertarians have few things like that to call our own.
Title: Liberty College Introduction
Post by: Luck on February 28, 2010, 02:51:33 pm
BACKGROUND - I had 3 years of conventional college toward a teaching degree. In one class it was stated that there are two teaching styles: planned and spontaneous. Spontaneous is the style I preferred, but, when I started my first student teaching class, the planned style was the only one offered. So I withdrew from my remaining classes and decided that, if I wanted to teach, I could do it in a free school of some kind. Now I'm attempting to start a free school, whose objective is to teach how to achieve Liberty.
- In the 1980s I read some of John Holt's books and magazines and was persuaded that his assessment of conventional education was largely correct, that the purposes of compulsory education are to provide cheap babysitting, to keep kids from competing with adults for jobs and to program kids for slots in conventional society, in which kids of the rich get the best jobs and kids of the poor get the worst jobs, in a manner that appears superficially to be fair to all. His book, Instead of Education, was probably the best one for explaining this.

SCHOOL PRISONS - Compulsory education is unjust imprisonment. I was painfully aware of my imprisonment and the unfairness of it when I was a student, but the abusive nature of it wasn't clear to me till I read Holt. Kids need to learn self-direction and self-sufficiency in order to mature socially and to pursue happiness, as is their right. Imprisonment in schools greatly delays or prevents this. Kids need to choose their own education and to have advisors available to them to help them choose it more productively. Parents need to understand that every course of study kids normally are exposed to in compulsory education can be taught without outside teachers. The internet makes conventional teachers largely irrelevant, as it makes much more information available. Although grade school and high school are called compulsory, the law generally has loopholes for any parents who do not want to send their kids to school prisons.

LEARNING - Teaching is one of the best ways to learn, so I want Liberty College to provide plenty of opportunity for students to teach or demonstrate whatever they want to. The first thing I want to try with Liberty College is weekly "fun times", where students and the public are invited to speak or perform for 3 minutes each. If it lasts 60 or 90 minutes, 20 to 30 people could have turns. There may also be longer time segments available afterward for more in-depth classes. I want to get everything videoed and posted to Youtube etc and all the speeches on computer files to be posted on a website in order to get a wider audience and to inspire similar projects everywhere, as well as to help organize knowledge & make it accessible.

ADVANTAGES - I want Liberty College to be a resource for anyone of any age. Kids and adults of any age could enroll in any classes. The college could serve as an alternative to compulsory schooling. I hope some of the advantages of Liberty College will be that:
1. Students are not subjected to negative peer pressure or the stress of competing for grades or of feeling imprisoned;
2. Students learn as fast as they want or at their own pace;
3. Grades reflect specific knowledge and skills, not temporary memorization, and tests are given individually and only when the student is ready;
4. Classes are cheap and can be paid with donations, loans, or barter;
5. The college will help students get apprenticeship jobs or start businesses while learning.

JOBS/COURSES - The kinds of jobs they could get at the college are: teaching, politics, ministry, business, accounting, management, marketing, self-defense, security, consulting, arts, writing, editing, computer tech, alternative health professions, parent/guardian training, horticulture, mechanics, construction, alternative science etc. My idea is for the college to make arrangements with appropriate local people to apprentice students for 3 to 6 months or more or to make students partners in various kinds of business etc. As apprentices students would work for little or no pay, but mainly just for the experience.
- Subjects under ministry would include: mythology; history of religion; world history; psychology & consciousness; morality & the Ten Commandments; health; knowledge; relationships; parenting; starting a church etc.
Title: Re: A Private Pro-Liberty School in New Hampshire?
Post by: Dreepa on February 28, 2010, 02:52:06 pm
still say it is too soon.

There are not enough students to make it viable.
Title: Re: A Private Pro-Liberty School in New Hampshire?
Post by: Luck on February 28, 2010, 03:06:58 pm
Maybe too soon for you, not me.
Title: Re: A Private Pro-Liberty School in New Hampshire?
Post by: rossby on February 28, 2010, 03:14:05 pm
Maybe too soon for you, not me.

If you have operating costs, you need to meet those.
Title: Re: A Private Pro-Liberty School in New Hampshire?
Post by: creaganlios on February 28, 2010, 08:52:06 pm
You seem to go back and forth between criticizing high schools and compulsory education and 'planned' teaching plans on the one hand...and then offering a 'college' on the other hand.  How does the latter respond to your frustrations with the former?  Do you want an alternative high school, or a college?

Thom
Title: Re: A Private Pro-Liberty School in New Hampshire?
Post by: Dreepa on February 28, 2010, 09:15:43 pm
Maybe too soon for you, not me.
correct it is too soon for me.  (or for anyone wanting to make a living off of it.)
Title: Liberty College
Post by: Luck on March 02, 2010, 12:45:22 pm
Quote
Do you want an alternative high school, or a college? Thom
* I want a college that's open to anyone of any age who can read etc, with the college's purpose being to teach how to achieve liberty. There's no reason it couldn't serve as an alternative school, for anyone who wants that, it seems to me.
Title: Re: Liberty College
Post by: creaganlios on March 02, 2010, 07:10:34 pm

Quote
I want a college that's open to anyone of any age who can read etc, with the college's purpose being to teach how to achieve liberty. There's no reason it couldn't serve as an alternative school, for anyone who wants that, it seems to me.

OK, well what you're moving towards is the Minnesota model, where any academically qualified high school student can spend the last two years of high school in a college (BTW, the state $ that would normally go to the public high school is used towards the students college tuition).  The credits earned while in college count towards both the students college degree and their high school credits/diploma.

Having said that, you wrote quite a bit about public schools being prisons, etc....so, if you want to address the brutal high school situation, are you suggesting becoming recognized as a high school?  Having students  enroll in high school but arrange to teach courses at your college (and somehow convincing school authorities that your non-accredited school is valid?)  Or are you looking at having students declare they are Home schooling for high school, and then offering your college courses as 'enrichment?' (this last option probably being the least problematic).

Again, I'm not opposed to your idea:  I am simply trying to get you to focus on a specific, realistic goal.
Title: Liberty College
Post by: Luck on March 02, 2010, 08:57:22 pm
* I appreciate your discussion. I didn't mean to sound unappreciative, if that's how I sounded.
* I doubt if I'll ever care about getting state accreditation of any kind. If any parents or their kids want to use the college as an alternative to compulsory schooling, I think the college will be able to do that - not just high school, but any grade.
* My plan may not seem very clear, but I don't think it needs to be real clear. I think I mentioned that my plan is to evolve the college out of "fun times". That's a weekly one or two hour event at which I'll invite people of any age to give 3-minute speeches or performances, in which they can share any knowledge they think is valuable, or they can get practice at public speaking or performing.
* I hope I'll be comfortable enough to speak there [at fun times event] myself briefly about the plan to evolve the college and to explain its purpose a bit and ask for students, teachers and members for the Board of Directors.
* My first step will be to ask Murphy's Taproom about doing the weekly event there. I want to get at least parts of the weekly event videoed and uploaded to sites like Youtube.

Quote
If you have operating costs, you need to meet those. B.D.
* I overlooked your comment earlier. Since I hope the college will be able to evolve, I'm guessing that there won't be much of operating costs. I had a lot of experience with 12 Step groups and they survive with minimal operating costs, so I hope the college can do similarly, at least in the beginning.
* I tried to start a similar kind of school about 2 years ago. At that time I was hoping to hire someone to do fundraising to cover expenses and I wanted the person doing fundraising to raise enough to pay their own salary, at least after a few months. I actually hired one guy, but he didn't do what I asked him to do, so I let him go quickly. But I had discussed the idea with several applicants and we almost tried it out. But then I decided to move to NH to try out the FSP [last year]. So now I want to try both at once.
Title: Re: A Private Pro-Liberty School in New Hampshire?
Post by: BigJoe on March 15, 2010, 01:08:53 pm
like the basic premise.  Although it seems like your not sure of who exactly will be signing up for this college and what would be their reasoning to do so?  Now I don't know much about anything, but I would think you could have better luck selling it as a supplement to juniors and seniors in high school as well as to home schooled teens.  I would suggest only offering two courses at a time, each with two lectures a week (90-120 min) in the evenings for 8-12 weeks, and then start again with two new courses right after.  Offering an attendance track and a 'degree' track, so some could pay to just come and learn and listen(probably more attractive to the post-college people who just want to learn), while others could pay to take the courses more actively and write papers and receive grades and eventually a diploma (successfully pass 10 courses or something).

I have no idea how hard it would be to gain official status, and be allowed to have your courses count as official credits in public high schools in NH, sounds very difficult, although it would massively increase the perceived legitimacy of the school in the eyes of parents.  I think an easier goal would be to get recognition from Universities that they see the Liberty School of NH degree as a sign of a student going beyond what is expected and taking their education in their own hands.  This would probably involve a legit looking website and a packet of some kind showing what the students had to do in order to earn the degree.  I think at worst, college admissions people would have to see it as a strong commitment to extra-curricular activities (and a learning based one at that).  So even if they don't think too much of the material or how hard it was to earn a good grade at the school, they have to be impressed by the time commitment, and passion to learn of the students.
Title: Re: A Private Pro-Liberty School in New Hampshire?
Post by: teacher424 on April 13, 2010, 09:29:53 pm
I'm new to this forum, so hi everyone!  I agree with Thom S-- I'd try to tap into Hillsdale.  Don't reinvent the wheel if you don't have to.  Can I teach there?
Title: Re: A Private Pro-Liberty School in New Hampshire?
Post by: LiftsBoxes on April 14, 2010, 04:16:50 pm
I think we would get further offering additional instruction and tutors to homeschoolers.
Title: Re: A Private Pro-Liberty School in New Hampshire?
Post by: CurtHowland on April 15, 2010, 04:11:02 pm
I think we would get further offering additional instruction and tutors to homeschoolers.

That is exactly what I thought reading this thread.

There are so many resources for "structured" instruction. As an example, Mises University and the new online-only Mises Acadamy http://academy.mises.org

Was it Stanford or MIT that was putting all if its courses online for people who wanted to study without bothering to get a degree?
Title: Re: A Private Pro-Liberty School in New Hampshire?
Post by: LiftsBoxes on April 17, 2010, 09:04:38 pm
Well, I'm qualified to teach history and geography.  My wife is qualified to teach English and writing.  I could also scare up a Hebrew teacher for foreign language instruction.  Just have to figure out a way to coordinate and get things moving ...
Title: Re: A Private Pro-Liberty School in New Hampshire?
Post by: maxxoccupancy on April 18, 2010, 12:19:47 am
I'm not 100% sure about the law, but I believe that it's against the law to teach kids in a school setting without having an education degree. 

Worst law ever.
Title: Re: A Private Pro-Liberty School in New Hampshire?
Post by: BigJoe on April 18, 2010, 05:31:15 am
I'm not 100% sure about the law, but I believe that it's against the law to teach kids in a school setting without having an education degree. 

Worst law ever.

sounds like a great opportunity for some civl disobedience.
Title: Re: A Private Pro-Liberty School in New Hampshire?
Post by: John Edward Mercier on April 18, 2010, 09:26:49 am
How can it be the 'worst law ever', if your not even sure about it?
And by the way... no, its not.
Title: Re: A Private Pro-Liberty School in New Hampshire?
Post by: antistate1190 on September 18, 2010, 12:18:37 pm
Well, let's hear it!
I was thinking the exact same thing! I'm concerned about our next generation and how they will be educated. Not everyone has the ability to homeschool so setting up a Liberty school for k-12 would be an excellent idea.
Title: Re: A Private Pro-Liberty School in New Hampshire?
Post by: CurtHowland on September 23, 2010, 07:59:50 am
I was thinking the exact same thing! I'm concerned about our next generation and how they will be educated. Not everyone has the ability to homeschool so setting up a Liberty school for k-12 would be an excellent idea.

When I move, whenever that is, this is going to be one of my priorities.

Make it "tutoring", rather than an institutional "school", and I don't think any law can stop it.
Title: Re: A Private Pro-Liberty School in New Hampshire?
Post by: creaganlios on September 23, 2010, 08:12:05 am
I'm not 100% sure about the law, but I believe that it's against the law to teach kids in a school setting without having an education degree. 

1000 % false.
Title: Re: A Private Pro-Liberty School in New Hampshire?
Post by: FreeStyle on September 23, 2010, 10:50:04 am
anyone in the know care to clarify? 

max was wrong on the internet?  talking out of his bum?  No wAY!!!
Title: Re: A Private Pro-Liberty School in New Hampshire?
Post by: greap on September 23, 2010, 11:48:08 am
It is false. Individual states set their own requirements for public schools (see http://certificationmap.com/) but private schools dont have the same requirements.

On the original point though I would be extremely hesitant to send my (future) children to a school that was pro any particular viewpoint (be it liberty, cake or death). Learning is about being exposed to many different ideas, ideally with as little bias in their presentation as possible, and not about teaching viewpoints. In addition I don't consider it good for a parent to indoctrinate a child in to liberty anymore then it is good to do so for religion.

The ideal would be for a good Sudbury School to open in the state. Lets kids choose what they want to learn and from whom.
Title: Re: A Private Pro-Liberty School in New Hampshire?
Post by: creaganlios on September 23, 2010, 05:35:39 pm
This thread continues to blur the idea of whether it is a high school or a college that is being discussed, and the difference *does* have practical repurcussions.  One of them  is the 'legitmacy' of the degree in the eyes of the world...to the extent that that matters to those enrolling in them.

One of the 'monopolies' that exists (and its private collusion, not government-imposed....food for thought, anarchists..) is the 'accredidation' conferred on colleges by the Regional accrediting associations (NEASC is the one that covers New England).  While having standards is a positive aspect of the accredidation process, the regiona accediitng bodies (and the colleges they approve) have assumed a "no-one-can-compete-with-us' approach to accredidation.  The reality is , there IS legimtiate scholarship OUTSIDE of the regionally-accredited bodies (as well as matchbook-cover diploma mills)

What would REALLY frost the buns of the Powers that Be would not be a mere 'Liberty School..."  but a new accrediting body that threatens the monopoly of the Rgeionals and whose mere existence would engender entrepreneurial efforts at starting multiple schools from multiple perspectives.
Title: Re: A Private Pro-Liberty School in New Hampshire?
Post by: HendrikVrij on September 24, 2010, 02:56:50 am
Question from a foreign FreeStater that wants to move to NH way before the 20k mark.

Is it possible to apply to your soon-to-be-made Liberty College and then apply for a student-visa? I am looking for any way possible to be able to stay in the US (short of staying illegally, since it would be very hard to find work)

Please let me know your thoughts
Title: Re: A Private Pro-Liberty School in New Hampshire?
Post by: CurtHowland on September 26, 2010, 07:40:58 pm
I don't see it as a university at all. I'm thinking grammar school.

By the time a student reaches highschool level work, they're either independent learners, or they're taking basic classes at the community college.

The point of a "liberty school" is not to indoctrinate, it's to instruct in basics. Math, reading, writing, and logical reasoning.

Government taught not as an ideal, but as a practical matter. That one change from what govt-run schools teach is part of logic. It's one thing to teach "here is the Constitution, isn't it great? That's why we pay taxes." It's entirely another matter to point out how reality differs from fantasy, be it in govt, religion, or history.

I was talking to my daughter today about this "liberty school". I would design it around the one-room-schoolhouse idea, with computers added.

Each student gets a subscription to Time4Learning.com, with a parent-student-instructor agreed upon daily requirement like "two lessons a day" (which is very easy to do), and when the student does a test the instructor will help the student understand any question they didn't get right.

Then there are group lessons, such as "addition & subtraction", "multiplication and subtraction", "fractions", "algebra", etc. The students who are at that level attend, regardless of age. Students who already know it help teach those learning. Questions are encouraged.

Someone takes a trip to NYC, they bring back pictures and present the trip to anyone interested. This teaches public speaking, with a question/answer period after the presentation.

The ham radio operator from the next town over comes by and presents what he does and how, with a question/answer period after the presentation. Dave Ridley can drop by and talk about his work. Etc, etc, etc.

I love reading Shakespeare plays out-loud, but there's no reason not to act it out if folks want to.

When I was in 4th and 5th grade, I was in an "open" school. It didn't work at all for me because they were so hung up on the fact I didn't make a "schedule" for myself every morning that nothing else happened _at_all_. But what struck me is that, with a little bit of motivation (like two or three or four Time4Learning.com lessons each day) to bring up subjects of inquiry, the rest of the day could easily be spent looking up interesting things that had been mentioned in those lessons.

"Shackelton did WHAT? Really? WOW!" etc.

Title: Re: A Private Pro-Liberty School in New Hampshire?
Post by: John Edward Mercier on September 27, 2010, 09:45:23 am
Your school taught you the constitution is GREAT?
Title: Re: A Private Pro-Liberty School in New Hampshire?
Post by: CurtHowland on September 27, 2010, 11:14:33 am
Your school taught you the constitution is GREAT?

They treated it like the Bible, as if it were Divinely inspired.

"See this part, and this part? These are why America is the greatest country on Earth, and why you are the most prosperous and free. Liberty! Freedom! And taxes are what pays for that freedom. The Soviet Union over there, they don't have the American Constitution, that's why they're all dirty and want to kill you with nuclear weapons they stole from US!"

Seriously. Don't forget the busts of Lincoln and FDR, saviors of America and paragons of all that is good and holy.

If you think Public School sucks now, you should have seen it in the 1960s when policies were set by The Greatest Generation, before their coddled liberal-arts commie offspring took it over to implement every social planning fad of the week.

Mind you, they didn't actually teach the Constitution, it was up on the wall to worship.
Title: Re: A Private Pro-Liberty School in New Hampshire?
Post by: John Edward Mercier on September 27, 2010, 11:55:10 am
I was taught by the public schools that the reason the various constitutions are 'living' documents,  so that they may be amended. Something that needs to be amended is obviously 'flawed'.
I don't think I every had a civics teacher that held the constitution could do more than limit majority whim... and even that only for an instance if they were paying respect to it.


Title: Re: A Private Pro-Liberty School in New Hampshire?
Post by: maxxoccupancy on October 03, 2010, 04:22:49 pm
Yeah, is someone working on this project?  Such a school could make money.  Liberal arts colleges do not need accreditation, and are relatively inexpensive to set up.
Title: Re: A Private Pro-Liberty School in New Hampshire?
Post by: 10stateswithnh on October 04, 2010, 10:45:55 am
I like the accreditation idea. We need free-market accreditation, professional certification groups, private insurance companies offering new kinds of insurance, etc, to make a free-market world work.
Title: Re: A Private Pro-Liberty School in New Hampshire?
Post by: LiftsBoxes on April 04, 2011, 10:56:46 am
The www.InformalU.org is targeted at middle and high school aged homeschoolers ... as well as people looking for a less structured approach to education, no matter what their age.
Title: Re: A Private Pro-Liberty School in New Hampshire?
Post by: TJames on February 18, 2012, 11:19:50 pm
There is a market. Most businesses start small anyway.
Title: Re: A Private Pro-Liberty School in New Hampshire?
Post by: EricMasters on April 17, 2012, 10:32:33 am
I love the idea but I don't believe the simple "ProLiberty" sales pitch will attract many students along with their eduction dollars. However, a school standing on it's own that happens to have a ProLiberty slant just might do the trick.
Title: Re: A Private Pro-Liberty School in New Hampshire?
Post by: freedomroad on April 17, 2012, 04:05:36 pm
There is a somewhat pro-liberty private high school in NH.  Check out Liberty Harbor Academy in Manchester, NH.