Free State Project Forum

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Pages: 1 [2] 3   Go Down

Author Topic: Natural Disaster Analysis of Candidate States!  (Read 47965 times)

Robert H.

  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1361
  • Jeffersonian
    • Devolution USA
Re:Natural Disaster Analysis of Candidate States!
« Reply #15 on: September 07, 2003, 02:52:02 am »

As Craft_6 points out, Yellowstone's volcano could potentially erupt anytime in the next 100,000 or so years.  Just like we're told that California is overdue for "the Big One," the Earth is overdue for an extinction level asteroid strike, and an Altantic island is "on the verge" of collapsing into the ocean and creating a tidal wave that would inundate the Eastern US all the way to the Tennessee Valley.

We have not yet learned to read the evidence in nature so as to determine what may happen and when.  Only recently have we developed the technology to even monitor most of these risks.  This is one reason why I'm very skeptical of the global warming craze.  For all we know, our current weather patterns could be part of a cycle that we do not understand.

Another reason is that I remember the "new ice age" warnings we were hearing back in the 70's.   ;D
« Last Edit: September 07, 2003, 02:55:03 am by RobertH »
Logged

Samizdat

  • FSP Participant
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 38
  • Llama! BDSM afficionado (Dom, med. S&m, B&D)
    • 911: the Road to Tyranny
Why Wyoming's a Bad Idea
« Reply #16 on: September 10, 2003, 09:26:12 pm »

« Last Edit: September 10, 2003, 09:30:53 pm by Samizdat »
Logged
"Family, friends you can trust -- that's more valuable than all the gold in the mountains" -- Alex Jones http://www.infowars.com or to listen live (M-F 11 A.M.-2 P.M. CST) http://sce.m2ktalk.com:8010/listen.pls or check http://www.infowars.com/listen.html for your nearest AM/FM affilia

StevenN

  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 191
  • Friend of the FSP
Re:Why Wyoming's a Bad Idea
« Reply #17 on: September 10, 2003, 10:40:21 pm »

I'll assume you're talking about Yellowstone as being a "World Heritage Site" by the United Nations. Run those under Google for more info.

First of all, I thought the UN had no actually binding soveriegnty. If the people of WY ignore the UN, what can they really do.

Plus, I think this is an issue that the vast majority of Wyomingans would be on our side, even if they're against us on everything else. Just tell 'em part of their state is being controlled by the UN.

So this highlights an interesting relationship between the UN, the Feds, and the state.

But believe me, nothing would be more satisfying that thumbing our noses at the enviro-bureaucrats at the UN!  ;)
Logged
"A noble spirit embiggens the smallest man" -- Jebediah Springfield

Bonner County

  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 53
Re:Why Wyoming's a Bad Idea
« Reply #18 on: September 10, 2003, 11:02:46 pm »

Thumbing your nose at the UN is quite fun.When they had their small arms conference.some of my buddies and I sent some helmets painted UN blue to Coffee Anus,they were perforated with 7.62mm and 5.56mm holes.
« Last Edit: September 10, 2003, 11:04:36 pm by Bonner County »
Logged
Remember children,after you pull the pin,Mr. Grenade is no longer your friend.

synthbaron

  • Guest
Re:Why Wyoming's a Bad Idea
« Reply #19 on: September 10, 2003, 11:05:12 pm »

If Yellowstone blows again during our lifetime, I think I'd be one to die quickly then to suffer the consequences elsewhere...
Logged

Samizdat

  • FSP Participant
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 38
  • Llama! BDSM afficionado (Dom, med. S&m, B&D)
    • 911: the Road to Tyranny
Re:Why Wyoming's a Bad Idea
« Reply #20 on: September 10, 2003, 11:22:19 pm »

Spazdat your link doesn't work

Try it now, Bonnet Country.
Logged
"Family, friends you can trust -- that's more valuable than all the gold in the mountains" -- Alex Jones http://www.infowars.com or to listen live (M-F 11 A.M.-2 P.M. CST) http://sce.m2ktalk.com:8010/listen.pls or check http://www.infowars.com/listen.html for your nearest AM/FM affilia

synthbaron

  • Guest
Re:Why Wyoming's a Bad Idea
« Reply #21 on: September 10, 2003, 11:23:01 pm »

Well, ok, maybe you wouldn't have to worry about it so much if you were in an eastern state:

http://www.solcomhouse.com/volano_lg.jpg
« Last Edit: September 10, 2003, 11:24:35 pm by Jay »
Logged

Samizdat

  • FSP Participant
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 38
  • Llama! BDSM afficionado (Dom, med. S&m, B&D)
    • 911: the Road to Tyranny
Re:Why Wyoming's a Bad Idea
« Reply #22 on: September 10, 2003, 11:27:55 pm »

I'll assume you're talking about Yellowstone as being a "World Heritage Site" by the United Nations. Run those under Google for more info.


Here's a novel suggestion: read the link http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2001/08/0828_wireyellowstone.html
Logged
"Family, friends you can trust -- that's more valuable than all the gold in the mountains" -- Alex Jones http://www.infowars.com or to listen live (M-F 11 A.M.-2 P.M. CST) http://sce.m2ktalk.com:8010/listen.pls or check http://www.infowars.com/listen.html for your nearest AM/FM affilia

johnadams

  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 630
  • Friend of the FSP, Libertarian
Re:Natural Disaster Analysis of Candidate States!
« Reply #23 on: September 11, 2003, 12:02:00 am »

The Jellystone Jiggle
[/font]
I had no idea that Yellowstone's volcano was as magmatically and seismically active as it is. Strange as it may seem, I find it fascinating. 15,000 earthquakes between 1973 and 1998? That's way cool! Luckily, given that Yellowstone is a park, I doubt there are many permanent dwellings there, and they have been adding a lot of monitoring equipment:

"The Yellowstone observatory consists of a string of 28 electronic detection stations scattered through the park. Related plans call for at least 100 more monitoring sites."

And if statist Californians can get used to earthquakes, surely rugged Porcupines can handle them too.

From Yellowstone Volcano: Is "the Beast" Building to a Violent Tantrum?
StandardNET
August 30, 2001

The Earth has always shaken periodically around Yellowstone. But without the proper monitoring equipment in place, no one knew how often it happened or why. [Robert Smith, a geophysicist at the University of Utah], who has been investigating here for more than 30 years, set up seismometers and found earthquakes by the hundreds.

...the earthquakes Smith started tracking three decades ago—15,000 between 1973 and 1998, often in swarms—didn't altogether fit conventional notions of seismicity. ....

"It was not a surprise it was a young volcano," [Robert Christiansen of the U.S. Geological Survey] recalled. "It was a surprise it was as young as it is." [Christiansen was the Scientist-in-Charge of the Mount St. Helens monitoring effort during the 1980 eruption.]

....Together, the two men were able to see the system for what it was: a very active and large volcano that had sculpted much of the Northwest.

In the mid-1970s, while surveying an old benchmark put into place when the first roads were cut through Yellowstone in 1923, Smith found that the ground had risen three feet (one meter) in five decades.

There could be only one explanation. The volcano was bulging upward.

Christiansen doubts the likelihood of another cataclysmic eruption any time soon, but he doesn't rule out something smaller. Earthquakes, rock slides, and steam explosions from geyser basins are all possible. A blowout on the scale of Mount St. Helens is conceivable, he said, adding: "We need to be prepared."


YELLOWSTONE EARTHQUAKES (1983-Present)
http://www.seis.utah.edu/HTML/YPEvents1983-Pres.html




From August 2003 Yellowstone Seismicity Summary
http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/yvo/monitoring.html

During the month of August 2003, 101 earthquakes were located in the Yellowstone region.  The largest shock to occur during this report period was a magnitude 4.3 earthquake on August 21st at 07:46 UTC, located about 23.3 miles south southeast of West Thumb, Wyoming and 9 miles southeast of the south entrance to Yellowstone National Park.


From Yellowstone Volcano Observatory Established
U.S. Geological Survey, Yellowstone National Park and the University of Utah Partnership  
May 14, 2001
http://www.seis.utah.edu/recactivity/yvorelease.shtml

The Yellowstone National Park and surrounding area encompass the largest active magmatic system in North America.
....

The Yellowstone region is seismically active. The 1959 Hebgen Lake earthquake (surface-wave magnitude 7.5), centered just outside the Park's northwestern boundary was responsible for 26 of the quake's 28 deaths. This event is one of the 15 strongest earthquakes ever recorded in the contiguous U.S.

"While the active geologic processes at Yellowstone do impart some risk to the public, they also make it a unique treasure -- it is the volcanic and seismic energy that powers the geysers and hot springs, creates the mountains and canyons, and generates the unique ecosystems that support Yellowstone's diverse wildlife," notes Paul K. Doss, Yellowstone National Park Coordinating Scientist of YVO


From When will Yellowstone erupt again?
http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/yvo/faqs4.html

We do not know. Future volcanic eruptions could occur within or near Yellowstone National Park for the simple reason that the area has a long volcanic history and because there is hot and molten rock, or magma, beneath the caldera now. Yellowstone is monitored for signs of volcanic activity by YVO scientists who detect earthquakes using seismographs and ground motion using GPS (Global Positioning System). YVO has not detected signs of activity that suggest an eruption is imminent.
....

Yellowstone's 2-million-year history of volcanism, the copious amount of heat that still flows from the ground, the frequent earthquakes, and the repeated uplift and subsidence of the caldera floor also testify to the continuity of magmatic processes beneath Yellowstone and point to the possibility of future volcanism and earthquake activity.
Logged
"men are born equally free and independent" - John Adams
World's Smallest Political Quiz

johnadams

  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 630
  • Friend of the FSP, Libertarian
Re:Why Wyoming's a Bad Idea
« Reply #24 on: September 11, 2003, 12:25:14 am »

FYI, Samizdat, there's already a thread on natural disasters, including more info on Yellowstone at: Jellystone Jiggle.
Logged
"men are born equally free and independent" - John Adams
World's Smallest Political Quiz

johnadams

  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 630
  • Friend of the FSP, Libertarian
Re:Why Wyoming's a Bad Idea
« Reply #25 on: September 11, 2003, 12:31:03 am »

If Yellowstone blows again during our lifetime, I think I'd be one to die quickly then to suffer the consequences elsewhere...
Yeah, cool! It would be like experiencing firsthand the fire and brimstone of the Book of Revelation.  Who needs the easy life in a state with economic prosperity when they can have that? ;D

Revelation 9:17 And thus I saw the horses in the vision, and them that sat on them, having breastplates of fire, and of jacinth, and brimstone: and the heads of the horses were as the heads of lions; and out of their mouths issued fire and smoke and brimstone.  
« Last Edit: September 11, 2003, 12:32:39 am by johnadams »
Logged
"men are born equally free and independent" - John Adams
World's Smallest Political Quiz

Morpheus

  • Guest
Re:Why Wyoming's a Bad Idea
« Reply #26 on: September 11, 2003, 06:12:28 am »

As absolutely non-Abrahamic as I am, I must say that the aesthetic and psychodrama of such is quite fascinating indeed...
« Last Edit: September 11, 2003, 06:15:20 am by Morpheus »
Logged

StevenN

  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 191
  • Friend of the FSP
Re:Why Wyoming's a Bad Idea
« Reply #27 on: September 11, 2003, 11:12:51 am »

Quote
Here's a novel suggestion: read the link

It was broken when I posted my response.
Logged
"A noble spirit embiggens the smallest man" -- Jebediah Springfield

Mike Lorrey

  • FSP Participant
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2745
  • Live Free and Never Die
    • The International Libertarian
Re:Natural Disaster Analysis of Candidate States!
« Reply #28 on: September 12, 2003, 02:45:00 pm »

NH's hurricane risk is only along the seacoast itself with storm surge tides. I've never seen hurricane damage in NH outside of a few downed trees. By the time a hurricane reaches our latitude, it has weakened considerably, and makes landfall on Long Island and CT, going across CT, RI, and MA before hitting NH. Winds are severely reduced by the time they reach us.

As for earthquakes, there have been only two earthquakes detectable by human beings in my entire life here in NH, and they were extremely minor, with absolutely NO damage reported anywhere in the state.

Tornado risk is extremely small. The worst tornadoes we get are F1 and those occur maybe once every few years.

Winter storm risk: yes we get them, and they can be very severe in terms of snowfall, icefall, and with roads shut down and power outages, but only on rare occasion. Anybody who is prepared (4wd, some home supplies, shovels, snowblowers, etc) never has problems dealing with them. If you look at winter as an adventure to be prepared for, you'll never suffer losses. Most people who die or are injured do so because they insist on driving in bad conditions with vehicles incapable of dealing with them. Typically these are flatlanders. It's evolution in action.

Flooding: generally once a decade we get significant rainfall in the spring, while the snow is melting in some part of the state that pushes rivers above flood stage. The Plymouth Plateau where the Baker and Pemigewassett Rivers join has had several of these, as much as 6 feet above the river banks, and we've had flooding in the Mascoma River Valley that went 2-4 feet above the river banks. The entire Merrimack and Connecticutt River watersheds have been the subject of flood control technologies for centuries now and I do not recall the last time someone died from flooding in NH.
Logged
The International Libertarian: The Journal of Liberty For Everyone, Everywhere, All The Time

Mike Lorrey

  • FSP Participant
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2745
  • Live Free and Never Die
    • The International Libertarian
Re:Natural Disaster Analysis of Candidate States!
« Reply #29 on: September 12, 2003, 02:49:08 pm »

The Jellystone Jiggle
[/font]
I had no idea that Yellowstone's volcano was as magmatically and seismically active as it is. Strange as it may seem, I find it fascinating.

From When will Yellowstone erupt again?
http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/yvo/faqs4.html

We do not know. Future volcanic eruptions could occur within or near Yellowstone National Park for the simple reason that the area has a long volcanic history and because there is hot and molten rock, or magma, beneath the caldera now. Yellowstone is monitored for signs of volcanic activity by YVO scientists who detect earthquakes using seismographs and ground motion using GPS (Global Positioning System). YVO has not detected signs of activity that suggest an eruption is imminent.
....

The thing is that the Yellowstone Caldera includes almost the entire area of the state of Wyoming. If you look at a topographical map that shows the continental divide lines, you'll see that the divide splits in southern Wyoming and comes back together up north. This entire basin is the collapsed caldera of Yellowstone. If, and when, Yellowstone blows again, it will be the entire state of Wyoming that will go up in smoke.
Logged
The International Libertarian: The Journal of Liberty For Everyone, Everywhere, All The Time
Pages: 1 [2] 3   Go Up
 

anything